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Steve King complains of ‘white supremacist’ censorship: ‘How did that language become offensive?’

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Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, just admitted in an interview that he doesn’t see why people make such a big deal out of the terms “white nationalist” and “white supremacist.”

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive? Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?” King asked during an interview with The New York Times that was published on Thursday.

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The same article reviewed the number of controversies that have emerged about Rep. King during his career as a member of the House of Representatives, which began when he was elected in 2002.

But at the same time, Mr. King’s margin of victory in 2018 shrank to its narrowest in 16 years. He made national headlines for endorsing a Toronto mayoral candidate with neo-Nazi ties and for meeting with a far-right Austrian party accused of trivializing the Holocaust. On Twitter, he follows an Australian anti-Semitic activist, who proposed hanging a portrait of Hitler “in every classroom.” And in October, the chairman of the Republican House elections committee, Representative Steve Stivers of Ohio, condemned Mr. King, saying, “We must stand up against white supremacy and hate in all forms.”

King also had a Confederate flag in his congressional office until recently, a fact not even justifiable on the already-tenuous grounds of regional loyalty (Iowa fought for the Union during the Civil War).

“Congressman Steve King’s recent comments, actions, and retweets are completely inappropriate. We must stand up against white supremacy and hate in all forms, and I strongly condemn this behavior,” Rep. Steve Stivers, R-Ohio, said in October after King endorsed a white nationalist running for mayor of Toronto and told an Austrian publication that white Europeans are a superior race and that a “Great Replacement” of whites with non-whites is occurring.

The Sioux City Journal, a major newspaper in King’s Iowa district, also made the bold choice not to endorse his reelection campaign in 2018, writing that King “holds up this district to ridicule and marginalizes himself within the legislative body he serves, neither of which provides benefit to Iowans who live and work here.” It cited, among other examples, King’s “tweet in support of a candidate for mayor of Toronto described in published reports as a ‘white nationalist’ or ‘white supremacist.’ That wasn’t the first time King was tied, by his words or actions, to such intolerant ugliness.”

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King’s racist views did lose him the support of major corporate sponsors like Purina and Land O’Lakes, and although he did win his reelection campaign in 2018, the margin by which he defeated Democratic rival J.D. Scholten was much more narrow than previous races in which King has run in that district.


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Donald Trump sounds like a complete lunatic because he’s isolated himself in a far-right media bubble

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Welcome to another edition of What Fresh Hell?, Raw Story’s roundup of news items that might have become controversies under another regime, but got buried – or were at least under-appreciated – due to the daily firehose of political pratfalls, unhinged tweet storms and other sundry embarrassments coming out of the current White House.

If you have an older relative who spends way too much time stewing in the conservative media, you may have experienced a moment when you not only disagreed with him, but you realized that you had no earthly clue what he was going on about. Perhaps it was when he started talking about the UN plot to eliminate golf courses and replace paved roads with bicycle paths. Maybe he stopped you in your tracks with a discourse on why flies were attracted to Barack Obama, or complained about the government insisting on referring to Christians as "Easter-worshippers" or expressed outrage over 9/11 hijackers being given leniency by Muslim jurists.

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Trump’s claim impeachment ‘nullifies’ 2016 election blown up in new House Judiciary Committee report

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On Saturday, the House Judiciary Committee released their report outlining the offenses committed by President Donald Trump, and the legal framework for impeachment — which clears the way for Congress to write and approve articles of impeachment against him.

One of the key issues examined by the report is the claim, repeatedly made by the president and his supporters, that impeachment would "nullify" the 2016 presidential election and the popular will — which is already a weak claim given that Trump never won the popular vote, and that impeaching Trump would still install Mike Pence as president. But the report more broadly rejects the entire claim that an election result immunizes a president from punishment for official misconduct.

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READ IT: House Judiciary Committee releases report defining Trump impeachable offenses

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On Saturday, the House Judiciary Committee released a report outlining the impeachable acts committed by President Donald Trump.

"Our President holds the ultimate public trust," said the report, titled "Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment," in its introduction. "A President faithful only to himself—who will sell out democracy and national security for his own personal advantage—is a danger to every American. Indeed, he threatens America itself."

The report clarifies the procedures for impeachment, analyzes whether president can be "impeached for abuse of executive powers," and "whether it is preferable to await the next election when a President has sought to corrupt that very same election."

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