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Here are the 7 craziest moments from Trump’s completely insane national emergency declaration

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President Donald Trump on Friday declared a national emergency as a pretext for building his wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, but the president often went off on strange and unrelated tangents about China, North Korea and other topics.

Trump’s rambling address was an utterly bizarre spectacle even by his own standards — here were the seven craziest moments.

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1.) Trump marvels at the economic potential of the communist dictatorship in North Korea. The president once again touted his “great relationship” with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and said he could imagine North Korea becoming a major economic hub in the coming years given its location near Russia, China and South Korea.

“It’s right smack in the middle!” Trump said of the country’s location. “Phenomenal!”

2.) Trump once again rants about women being tied up and having tape put over their mouths. While talking about the dangers of undocumented immigrants, Trump once again returned to one of his favorite topics: Women kidnapped by human traffickers.

“You can’t take [women & girls] through ports of entry,” Trump said, describing a need to build a border wall. “You can’t have them tied up in the backseat of a car… they can’t see three women with tape on their mouths or three women whose hands are tied.”

3.) Trump praises China for executing drug dealers. Trump dubiously claimed that there is no problem with drug addiction in China because its government simply has drug dealers killed.

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“Their criminal list is much tougher than our criminal list,” the president said of China. “Their criminal list, the drug dealer gets a thing called the death penalty! Our criminal list, a drug dealer gets a thing called, ‘How about a fine!'”

4.) Trump rips his fellow Republicans for not building the wall during his first two years in office. The president seemed to take a veiled shot at former House Speaker Paul Ryan, who for two years did not fight to fund the president’s wall.

“We have a little disappointment for the first year and a half,” he said. “People that should have stepped up didn’t step up. They didn’t step up and they should have. It would’ve been easy.”

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5.) Trump admits that his emergency order will likely go down in flames in U.S. courts.

“We will have a national emergency,” Trump said, before adding, “and we will then be sued, and they will sue us in the Ninth Circuit, even though it shouldn’t be there, and we will possibly get a bad ruling, we’ll get another bad ruling, then we’ll end up in the Supreme Court, then hopefully we’ll get a fair shake, and we’ll win in the Supreme Court.”

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6.) Trump rambles about right-wing talk show hosts who say nice things about him. The president gave a special shout out to the conservative pundits who pushed him to shut down the federal government, and he even praised Rush Limbaugh for having the stamina to talk on the radio for three straight hours.

“Sean Hannity has been a terrific, terrific supporter of what I do,” Trump said. “Rush Limbaugh, I think he’s a great guy. For 3 hours, he speaks. He’s got one of the biggest audiences.”

7.) Trump admits he didn’t actually need to sign an emergency order to build the wall.

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“I didn’t need to do this,” Trump said of the emergency order. “But I’d rather do it much faster.”

Admitting this could undercut Trump’s legal argument that he had to declare a national emergency, as it is difficult to argue that you needed to do something when you admit that you didn’t need to do it.


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There’s no respite from Trump’s vindictiveness and foolishness

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As we know, even in the midst of a national emergency, Donald Trump could find time and bandwidth to continue his retribution campaign.

He dismissed Michael Atkinson, the inspector general for the intelligence agencies, for doing “a terrible job,” satisfying his own thirst for vengeance for anyone who actually adhered to law and practice over blind loyalty to Trump himself. Indeed, asked about it the next day, Trump underscored his action by saying, Atkinson “was no Trump supporter, that I can tell you.”

It was an act that we once would have labeled corruption, by Democrats and Republicans – that is using the office for personal purposes – if Congress and too many Americans had not since become inured by so many like instances.

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This is how Taiwan and South Korea bucked the global lockdown trend

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As the coronavirus pandemic sparks global lockdowns, life has continued comparatively unhindered in places like Taiwan, South Korea and Hong Kong after their governments and citizens took decisive early action against the unfolding crisis.

At first glance Taiwan looks like an ideal candidate for the coronavirus. The island of 23 million lies just 180 kilometres (110 miles) off mainland China.

Yet nearly 100 days in, Taiwan has just 376 confirmed cases and five fatalities while restaurants, bars, schools, universities and offices remain open.

The government of President Tsai Ing-wen, whose deputy is an epidemiologist, made tough decisions while the crisis was nascent to stave off the kind of pain now convulsing much of the rest of the world.

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Republican ex-lawmaker with coronavirus scolds Wisconsin GOP for forcing voters to risk their health

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On CNN Tuesday, former Rep. Charlie Dent (R-PA), who is himself dealing with a bout of COVID-19, chastised the Wisconsin GOP for doing everything in their power to block the state elections from being moved — and forcing many voters to stand in line and risk exposure to the virus to cast their ballot.

"I have to tell you, here in Pennsylvania we have a Democratic governor and Republican legislature," Dent told host Don Lemon. "They postponed the election here from April 28 until June 2. Without any controversy. Everybody agreed it was the right thing to do and they moved on. I'm surprised Wisconsin took this risk, knowing they don't have to."

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