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BAFTA suspends ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ director Bryan Singer nomination

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The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) has suspended “Bohemian Rhapsody” director Bryan Singer’s nomination for Sunday’s awards ceremony following allegations of sexual misconduct.

The 53-year-old was listed alongside producer Graham King and screenwriter Anthony McCarten for the Queen biopic’s nomination in the “Outstanding British Film” category.

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But in a statement posted on its website late on Wednesday, BAFTA said it had informed Singer that his nomination had been suspended “in light of recent very serious allegations”.

There was no immediate reply to emails sent to Singer’s agent and lawyer seeking comment. There was no answer from a telephone number listed for his agent in California outside of office hours.

“BAFTA considers the alleged behavior completely unacceptable and incompatible with its values. This has led to Mr Singer’s suspended nomination,” BAFTA said.

“BAFTA notes Mr Singer’s denial of the allegations. The suspension of his nomination will therefore remain in place until the outcome of the allegations has been resolved.”

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The BAFTA statement did not give any detail of the allegations.

Last month, U.S. magazine The Atlantic published an article in which four men accused Singer of sexual misconduct, including being molested or seduced by the director despite them being underage.

Singer has denied the allegations, saying in a statement published at the time by online magazine Deadline that The Atlantic article was “a homophobic smear piece”.

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Singer, also known for “The Usual Suspects” and “X-Men”, was dropped as “Bohemian Rhapsody” director in late 2017, with Hollywood media reports citing clashes on set.

At the time, Twentieth Century Fox said filming had been temporarily halted in its last weeks “due to the unexpected unavailability of Bryan Singer”, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

    The publication later put out a statement from Singer in which he said the studio would not allow him time off to “deal with pressing health matters concerning one of my parents” and that his contract was terminated.

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BAFTA said the film was still nominated in the Outstanding British Film category and that “the other individuals named as candidates in respect of the film remain nominees”.

The awards ceremony will take place in London on Sunday.

Reporting by Marie-Louise Gumuchian; Editing by Alison Williams

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Trump’s utterly clueless sons rail against Hunter Biden’s nepotism

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Former Vice President Joe Biden's son Hunter appeared on ABC's "Good Morning America" on Tuesday, and when asked if he thought foreign companies and investment banks would have hired him if his name wasn't Biden he said, "Probably not." He is correct. The younger Biden had little to no experience in the businesses for which he was paid big salaries. He was hired because he is the son of a powerful person, clearly in hopes that they would have some influence with the father and impress their customers with the fact that they were so close to someone with influence.

That reeks of class privilege and it is incredibly common in American business and politics. I don't think I have ever worked anywhere in my life where cronyism, nepotism and influence-peddling weren't present in some form or another. Hiring some ne'er-do-well relative is one of the ways rich and powerful people scratch each other's backs — and, not incidentally, ensure that the quasi-aristocracy of the one percent is perpetuated. If anything, what's uncommon is for some scion of the powerful to openly admit he only got the job was because of his name. Usually, they fatuously insist their "success" is due to their own unique brilliance and talent.

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Trump waves off deaths in Syria: The Kurds are ‘no angels’

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President Donald Trump on Wednesday defended his decision to leave Syria by saying the Kurds are "no angels."

Trump made the remarks during a White House meeting.

"They are no angels, by the way," he was quoted as saying about the Kurds.

Republicans have accused Trump of betraying a U.S. ally by abandoning the Kurds to be crushed by Turkish forces in Syria.

Read some of the reports below.

Per pool, Trump described the Kurds as "no angels." Your regular reminder that the Kurds were our allies in the fight against ISIS -- which Trump has taken full credit for eradicating.

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Trump’s tax inconsistencies look like ‘bank fraud’: Ex-prosecutor

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On Wednesday, former federal prosecutor Joyce Vance argued that the inconsistencies in Trump's tax information resemble outright "bank fraud," and must be subject to further investigation:

No surprise that Trump’s NY state tax filings are inconsistent with bank loan applications. Perhaps there’s an explanation but it looks like either bank fraud or tax fraud & at a minimum, merits further investigation. https://t.co/czxdpNjrvA

— Joyce Alene (@JoyceWhiteVance) October 16, 2019

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