Quantcast
Connect with us

‘This is not Russia!’ Dem Congressman calls out Republican efforts to erode ‘essence of our democracy’

Published

on

In a speech to the House Oversight Committee on Wednesday, Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., did not hold back while arguing that “most Republicans” have tried to keep people from voting by “cutting back on early voting, eliminating polling places, and taking other steps to reduce the number of people who vote.”

“Especially troubling,” he said, “in some cases, they have engaged in illegal efforts to suppress the vote that target minority communities.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“One year ago today, on my mother’s dying bed, at 92 years old — former sharecropper — her last words were, ‘Do not let them take our votes away from us,’ ” Cummings said during Wednesday’s hearing. “They had fought. She had fought and seen people harmed, beaten, trying to vote. Talk about inalienable rights. Voting is crucial, and I don’t give a damn how you look at it.”

American politicians, Cummings argued, should be making it easier for people to vote and encouraging increased voter turnout through “early voting, absentee voting, voting by mail, and other ways to help citizens cast their votes.”

Cummings championed a bill, H.R. 1, that would simultaneously protect voters’ rights and attempt to remove the covert influence of big money in politics. He called H.R. 1 “one of the boldest reform packages to be considered in the history of this body,” and declared that the “sweeping legislation will clean up corruption in government, fight secret money in politics, and make it easier for American citizens across this country to vote” to open his remarks.

Cummings pointed to controversial anti-voter efforts in North Carolina, Georgia and Kansas. After that, he discussed how H. R. 1 would “institute procedures to automatically register eligible voters and put in place protections to keep them on the correct voter rolls. It would provide for expanded early voting and absentee voting and give additional funding to states to maintain enough polling sites so everyone can easily go cast their ballot.”

Cummings vowed to “fight until the death” to ensure that every citizen has the right to vote, “because it is the essence of our democracy.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“This is not Russia,” he said. “This is the United States of America!”

One of the most controversial election fiascos occurred in Georgia, where Republican candidate Brian Kemp managed to purge 340,134 voters from the rolls in his campaign to defeat Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams and become the next governor. Because the difference between Kemp and Abrams was less than 60,000 votes, Abrams could have won if even one-third of the purged voters had showed up and (as is considered likely) had overwhelmingly voted for her.

“We have already been told that has Brian Kemp has laid down the law to all the counties, ‘You are not to count provisional ballots of anyone who has been purged, even if they have been purged wrongly,'” journalist Greg Palast told Salon last year. “Now we have, as we know, 340,134 people purged for moving who didn’t move. We don’t know how many will vote, but if they show up, they have been given no notice, and when they show up a lot of them will be shocked to find that they have been removed from the voter rolls.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Cummings also discussed a feature of the bill that would implement new reforms in the Executive Branch, explaining that his focus would be on the section that falls within the committee’s jurisdiction under Title VIII. These would include a ban on senior officials “from accepting ‘golden parachute’ payments from private sector employers in exchange for their government service,” a provision that Cummings claims would have prevented former Director of the National Economic Council Gary Cohn “from receiving more than $100 million in accelerated payments from Goldman Sachs while leading the Trump Administration’s efforts to slash corporate taxes.” Another section would “require transition teams to have ethics plans in place and make those plans publicly available,” while a third would “prohibit senior federal employees from working on matters that affect the financial interests of their former employers or prospective employers. They could obtain waivers for this requirement, but those waivers would have to be made public.”

Finally — and perhaps as the most pointed rebuke of President Donald Trump — “Title VIII also would make clear that Congress expects the President to divest his business holdings — just as every single President since Jimmy Carter has done — and place them in an independent and truly blind trust.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Previous attention has been drawn to the ways in which Trump’s perceived or actual corruption can hurt the economy. As Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M., explained in a report from 2017, “Congress must be vigilant against the potential for President Trump to enrich himself and his family at the expense of the average American. The president and his family’s conflicts of interests are inexcusable and unacceptable, and could depress economic output by over $1,000 per person just in one year. Not only are these practices dangerous, but harmful to the economic security of American families across the country.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has already announced her support for H. R. 1 and her commitment to “advancing” it, although this refers not to having an immediate floor vote but rather to House committees holding hearings on the measure.

“During this Black History Month, I am pleased we will be advancing H.R. 1, which contains Congressman John Lewis’s Voter Empowerment Act ensuring equal access to the ballot for every eligible voter, and lays the groundwork of the subsequent passage of Congresswoman Terri Sewell’s Voting Rights Advancement Act,” Pelosi wrote in a “Dear Colleague” letter on Monday.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

MSNBC guest goes off on Chris Matthews for comparing Sanders to Nazis: ‘He had kin murdered in the Holocaust’

Published

on

Time magazine editor Anand Giridharadas criticized MSNBC host Chris Matthews over the weekend for his alleged bias against Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders.

Giridharadas remarks came after Matthews compared Sanders' win in Nevada to a Nazi invasion.

"Last night was a historic win that I think a lot of us are still struggling to understand," Giridharadas explained. "It's historic because we may be seeing that we are paddling through a bend of a river in history here. Something is happening in America right now that actually does not fit our mental models."

Continue Reading

2020 Election

‘Kiss Florida goodbye’: Voto Latino head warns Democrats of coming 2020 debacle

Published

on

Appearing on MSNBC's "AM Joy," Voto Latino CEO María Teresa Kumar said Democrats should not count on taking Florida's 29 electoral votes in the upcoming 2020 presidential election if Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) is the at the top of the ticket.

During a fairly contentious panel discussion on the viability of Sanders as a candidate due to self-identifying as a democratic socialist, Kumar claimed that would not play well Florida's Latino community.

"All I can think about when David [Corn] was unpacking it for us, we can all agree is you can kiss Florida goodbye," she explained. "I say that, Floridians -- Latinos that have fled socialism, they have fled and they are in Florida and they have sensibilities that are different from the rest of the Latino community."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

CNN’s Bakari Sellers schools Rick Santorum over claim Trump is not part of the ‘extreme hard right’

Published

on

During a panel discussion on CNN's State of the Union, contributor Bakari Sellers set fellow panelist Rick Santorum straight after he tried to claim that Donald Trump doesn't take far-right positions.

Following a discussion on Sen. Bernie Sanders' Nevada caucus win, Santorum tried to note the major differences between Trump and Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Responding to conservative commentator Linda Chavez who called both Sanders and Trump "two angry people," Santorum remarked, "I wanted to take issue with what Linda said: two angry folks representing the extremes, and I would agree with that, with Bernie Sanders, and he is representing, no question, the extreme of the Democratic Party and he says that he is a socialist and he is angry, I agree."

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image