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Queen Elizabeth to be evacuated in case of Brexit unrest: report

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British officials have revived Cold War emergency plans to relocate the royal family should there be riots in London if Britain suffers a disruptive departure from the European Union next month, two Sunday newspapers reported.

“These emergency evacuation plans have been in existence since the Cold War, but have now been repurposed in the event of civil disorder following a no-deal Brexit,” the Sunday Times said, quoting an unnamed source from the government’s Cabinet Office, which handles sensitive administrative issues.

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The Mail on Sunday also said it had learnt of plans to move the royal family, including The Queen, to safe locations away from London.

Britain’s government is struggling to get parliamentary support for a Brexit transition agreement with the EU before the departure date of March 29, and the government and businesses are preparing contingency plans for a ‘no-deal’ Brexit.

Business groups have warned of widespread disruption if there are lengthy delays to EU imports due to new customs checks, and even possible shortages of food and medicine.

Last month an annual speech by the 92-year-old queen to a local women’s group was widely interpreted in Britain as a call for politicians to reach agreement over Brexit.

Jacob Rees-Mogg, a Conservative lawmaker and keen supporter of Brexit, told the Mail on Sunday he believed the plans showed unnecessary panic by officials over a no-deal Brexit, as senior royals had remained in London during World War Two bombing.

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But the Sunday Times said an ex-police officer formerly in charge of royal protection, Dai Davies, expected The Queen would be moved out of London if there was unrest.

“If there were problems in London, clearly you would remove the royal family away from those key sites,” Davies was quoted as saying.

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Congressional subpoenas will be ‘forever unenforceable’ if GOP lets Trump off the hook: conservative attorney

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Conservative attorney Gabriel Malor, who in the past has written legal analyses for right-wing publications such as The Federalist and the Washington Examiner, warns that Republicans will be setting a dangerous precedent if they let President Donald Trump off the hook for his unprecedented obstruction of the House of Representatives' impeachment inquiry.

Writing on Twitter, Malor argues that giving Trump a pass on the House's proposed obstruction of Congress charge will neuter any future congressional inquiry into the executive branch.

"There's a real danger that if the Senate does not convict on the obstruction of Congress count, congressional subpoenas will be forever unenforceable," he writes. "If Congress itself rules that defiance of congressional subpoenas is no error, how could the courts in any future litigation?"

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Trump wrote a $2 million check to cover damages from misuse of charity funds: report

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New York Attorney General Letitia James revealed Tuesday that President Donald Trump has paid $2 million in damages after being found guilty for misuse of charity funds.

The Washington Post also reported that the remaining $1.8 million left in Trump's "foundation," would be distributed to eight charities, which will get $476,140.41. The foundation was shut down in 2018 after a judge demanded it be desolved.

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‘Way worse than Nixon’: GOP challenger calls for Trump’s impeachment for ‘extortion’

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A Republican presidential candidate agrees with House Democrats that President Donald Trump has committed impeachable offenses and should be removed from office.

Bill Weld, the former Massachusetts governor and current GOP primary challenger, said Trump's crimes were "way worse than Nixon" and clearly worthy of impeachment, reported WGBH-FM.

"I've never seen such evidence in an obstruction case," Weld said.

The former federal prosecutor, who served as counsel in the impeachment inquiry into President Richard Nixon, said lawmakers from both parties had a duty to impeach Trump.

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