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Republicans brutally mocked for their bizarre obsession with potential Cohen book deals

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After multiple Republicans asked former Trump “fixer” Michael Cohen if he’s got a book deal about the president in the works, Twitter users pointed out exactly how outrageous the repeated questions were.

As Deadline reported, at least three GOP House members asked Cohen if he intends to segue his experiences with Donald Trump into a book deal or TV appearances — questions the newly-disbarred attorney answered by noting that he’d been approached but has nothing in the works.

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New York Times TV critic James Poniewozik pointed out both how outlandish the questions were and its purposes.

“Any publisher would have given Michael Cohen a zillion bucks for a book whether he went before Congress or not,” Poniewozik wrote, adding that nevertheless, “this will not prevent your uncle on Facebook from posting ‘book deal’ dozens of times, which I assume is the goal of the repetition.”

Preet Bharara, the former U.S. Attorney with the Southern District of New York, noted, “there is a ton to attack Cohen on” — and focusing on a book deal is “lazy.”

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NBC News political reporter Carrie Dann, meanwhile, noted that Republicans — including the president and his followers — are not immune from profiting off of book deals.

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Trump, Dann noted, “routinely encourages his 59 million Twitter followers to buy books offering him favorable coverage, which one assumes the authors hope translates into, uh, lucrativeness.”

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Check out more responses below:

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https://twitter.com/SeeJaneMarie/status/1100832033561968640

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Trump pushed for a sweetheart tax deal on his first hotel — it’s cost NYC $410,068,399 and counting

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In 1975, New York City was run-down and on the verge of bankruptcy. Twenty-nine-year-old Donald Trump saw an opportunity. He wanted to acquire and redevelop the dilapidated Commodore Hotel in midtown Manhattan next to Grand Central Terminal.

Trump had bragged to the executive controlling the sale that he could use his political connections to get tax breaks for the deal.

The executive was skeptical. But the next day, the executive was invited into Trump’s limousine, which ushered him to City Hall. There, he met with Donald’s father Fred and Mayor Abe Beame, to whom the Trumps had given lavishly.

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Mitch McConnell’s impeachment rules pass by 53-47 vote — here’s what happens next in Trump’s senate trial

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The US Senate voted along party lines on Tuesday to set the rules for President Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial.

By a 53 to 47 vote, the Republican-controlled Senate approved an "organizing resolution" for the trial proposed by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Before approving the rules, the Senate voted down several amendments proposed by Democrats seeking to subpoena witnesses and documents from the White House and State Department.

These are the next phases in Trump's impeachment trial, just the third of a president in US history:

- Opening arguments -

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Chief Justice Roberts admonishes lawyers at Senate impeachment trial

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Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court John Roberts made his first major intervention in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial shortly before 1 a.m. Wednesday morning.

After House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) finished his closing arguments on why former National Security Advisor John Bolton should testify, the White House team went on the attack. Yelling and demanding apologies, the president's team was more animated than they'd been all night. Roberts then admonished the House and White House on their language.

Claiming the Senate is the "world's greatest deliberative body" -- despite what he had witnessed during 12 hours of the impeachment trial -- Roberts complained about language that was "not conducive to civil discourse."

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