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Tax the rich? Most Americans think it’s a great idea

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“Who else is tired of an economy and a tax code that benefits the wealthy and corporations while working Americans are left behind?” the national economic justice movement Tax March asked on Wednesday.

According to recent polling, the answer is “Most Americans.”

A poll this month by the New York Times and Survey Monkey showed that most Americans from across the political spectrum support “tax the rich” proposals like the ones put forward by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), with nearly two-thirds of Americans saying that the current economic system — in which the richest 0.00025 percent of the population now owns more wealth than the bottom 60 percent — is immoral.

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“They’re not paying their fair share,” Fred Wood of Williamsport, Pennsylvania told the Times. “It’s just not right when folks cannot afford healthcare.”

Warren’s plan to levy a two percent tax on the assets of Americans with more than $50 million has proven popular, with 75 percent of Democrats and more than half of Republicans supporting the proposal. The “Ultra-Millionaires Tax” would raise $2.75 trillion over a decade, according to economists advising Warren, and would partially be used to pay for the senator’s universal childcare plan.  

“Across party lines, Americans want the very wealthiest families to pay their fair share so we can have an economy that works for everyone,” Warren told the Times.

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The newspaper’s polling also found that Ocasio-Cortez’s proposal to tax income over $10 million at 70 percent is popular with Americans — despite Republicans’ and centrist Democrats’ attempts to portray the idea as “unrealistic.”

Fifty-one percent of respondents supported Ocasio-Cortez’s plan, including about a third of Republicans.

The Times pointed out that the public has for decades believed that the government should force the wealthiest Americans and corporations to pay more in taxes—but that they have rarely been given the opportunity to vote for politicians who offer ambitious tax proposals.

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“This is about politicians catching up to where Americans have been,” political scientist Leslie McCall told the Times.

The poll results followed Sen. Bernie Sanders’s (I-Vt.) Tuesday announcement that he was officially entering the 2020 presidential race. As part of his argument for his candidacy, Sanders noted that his condemnation of the outsize wealth of millionaires and billionaires was treated as “radical” by many during his 2016 campaign—but that his demand the richest Americans contribute far more to the common good has now gone mainstream.

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This post was originally published on Common Dreams

 


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As coronavirus seizes the state, Florida hospitals are in panic mode

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As Florida experiences a surge in coronavirus cases, the residents of the state are facing obstacles like overwhelmed hospitals and a looming shortage in beds.

This article first appeared in Salon.

There are 47,663 hospital beds in the state right now with 11,782 available (meaning a remaining capacity of 19.82 percent) and a total staffed bed capacity of 59,445, according to the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration's Hospital Bed Capacity Dashboard. The state Department of Health also reported on Friday that, out of 95,300 individuals who received coronavirus test results over the course of the previous day, 11,433 tested positive for COVID-19 (all but 90 of whom were Florida residents), meaning that more than 12 percent of the new cases had positive test results. The state also reported 93 new deaths due to COVID-19. (Salon reached out to the Florida Department of Health for comment on this story.)

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2020 Election

The GOP is a suicide cult

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Welcome to another edition of What Fresh Hell?, Raw Story’s roundup of news items that might have become controversies under another regime, but got buried – or were at least under-appreciated – due to the daily firehose of political pratfalls, unhinged tweet storms and other sundry embarrassments coming out of the current White House.

Back in March, we argued that Donald Trump had become the charismatic leader of the dumbest suicide cult ever. There were fewer than 500 confirmed cases of Covid-19 at the time, but it wasn't difficult to see the trajectory we were on at even that early date. At the time, we were commenting on the President's* repeated claims that the whole thing was a big hoax and polls showing that Democrats were twice as likely as Republicans to say they were taking steps to avoid becoming infected.

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Trump has committed at least 11 disgraceful acts just since April: conservative

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On Saturday, writing for The Washington Post, conservative columnist Max Boot outlined all of the chaos President Donald Trump has caused just in the last three months — arguing that "he has disgraced the nation’s highest office as no previous occupant has come close to doing."

"Think about all that has happened since April 5," wrote Boot. "That was before security forces attacked peaceful protesters in Lafayette Square so that Trump could stage a bizarre photo-op. Before he pushed to send the armed forces into the streets. Before he embraced 'white power' and called Black Lives Matter 'a symbol of hate.' Before he vowed to veto the defense authorization bill to prevent the renaming of military bases named after Confederate generals. Before he used the novel coronavirus as an excuse to shut down immigration and threatened to revoke the visas of college students unable to attend classes in the fall."

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