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Trump uses National Prayer Breakfast speech to undermine civil rights of LGBT people

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- Commentary

President Donald Trump delivered his third speech at the annual National Prayer Breakfast, and used the opportunity to attack LGBT people’s civil rights and show support for those who wish to discriminate.

After promising attendees at the event hosted by a secretive Christian fundamentalist evangelical organization that he will “never let you down,” President Trump applauded Second Lady Karen Pence for choosing to return to teaching at a private Christian school. The President did not mention that the school bans all LGBT people, including teachers and students. It even bans students who have LGBT family members.

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President Trump also praised a Michigan Catholic adoption agency, then lamented that they are now in court after being sued for discriminating against same-sex parents.

“We will always protect our country’s long and proud tradition of faith-based adoption,” Trump promised attendees, adding that faith-based adoption agencies should be able to follow their “deeply held beliefs.”

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What the President also failed to tell attendees is that that adoption agency is being used to funnel some of the thousands of migrant children his administration has separated at the border, and it has ties to Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.

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Trump unleashes yet another maddening scandal as he opens the door to Saudi Arabian interference

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I don’t often talk about how mad I am. I don’t often talk about how mad I am, because talking often about how mad I am prevents me from speaking clearly and rationally. I want to speak clearly and rationally. There is so much need for speaking clearly and rationally amid the endless streams of waste and filth polluting our public discourse.

This article was originally published at The Editorial Board

But I can’t speak clearly and rationally at the expense of morality. Morality often begins with a feeling. The Gospels tell us of Jesus looking on the poor—he could hear and smell their misery—and he was “moved with pity.” But another way of putting it, another way of translating ?????????????, is that the rabbi felt compassion “in his guts.

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What the Trump impeachment inquiry means for the rest of the world

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Once again, the United States is experiencing the profound drama of Presidential impeachment proceedings. But, dissimilar from the past, this time the implications for the rest of the world could be large.

Consider the two modern predecessors to today’s impeachment inquiry into President Donald J. Trump’s attempt to persuade Ukraine’s government to begin a criminal investigation of one of his leading Democratic challengers, former Vice President Joe Biden and Biden’s son Hunter.

The first was the slow-brewing crisis that began with a midnight break-in at the Democratic National Committee’s offices at the Watergate Hotel in Washington in 1972. This impeachment went on for two years and consumed the American political system. It finally ended in President Richard Nixon’s resignation in August 1974. The second was the special counsel investigation of President William J. Clinton, who was impeached in the U.S. House of Representatives but acquitted by the Senate in 1999.

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Cynicism may be the real threat to impeachment

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Cynicism is to democratic politics what rust is to motor vehicles. Both are corrosive if left unchecked. Rust will destroy a vehicle, and cynicism, if it becomes endemic, will ultimately destroy democracy.

This thought struck me after some recent conversations with a few friends and acquaintances about the possible impeachment of President Trump. The cynical view of the process is that all politicians are corrupt in one way or another; they act based on self-interest and not in the public interest. In this view, Trump is no different; he is just doing what politicians do. This type of public cynicism may very well be the greatest impediment that Democrats face during the impeachment process. As David Brooks recently wrote in the New York Times, “it’s a lot harder to do impeachment in an age of cynicism, exhaustion and distrust” especially when Trump’s actions are viewed by many as “the kind of corruption that politicians of all stripes have been doing all along.”

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