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Trump’s 2016 campaign still has massive overdue bills for law enforcement providing security

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President Donald Trump speaks to police officers (Photo: Screen capture)

The Center for Public Integrity reported just after the 2016 election that Donald Trump might tout his love for law enforcement but he hasn’t paid his bills to them.

Two years (to the day) after that report, Dave Levinthal said that the president still hasn’t paid his bills.

“President Trump today met with a group of sheriffs and had kind words for them,” Levinthal tweeted before quoting Trump. “‘I’m with some of the great law enforcement people. A lot of them are friends of mine. I’ve known them for a long time, and they’ve been fantastic people. Fantastic men and women.’ [The Center for Public Integrity] reported two years ago that Trump’s presidential committee was ignoring law enforcement and security bills sent to it by various municipalities. When last we checked in late 2018, the bills remained unpaid.”

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Trump regularly holds up law enforcement as his heroes, but when it comes to paying them, it seems he’s no longer supportive.

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During a May 2018 event celebrating officers killed in the line of duty, Trump said, “We will protect those who protect us.”

“I especially want to speak to the young sons and daughters who join us here today,” Trump continued. “I want you to know that your moms and dads are among the bravest Americans to ever live. When danger came, when darkness fell, when destruction loomed, they did not flinch. They were not afraid they did not falter they stared down danger, raced down alleys, chased down criminals, kicked down doors and faced down evil. Brave.”

These so-called “brave heroes” put their own lives on the line for Trump before he was the president. It’s unclear why the campaign doesn’t feel they should be paid.

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According to campaign finance reports, Trump’s campaign has already raised over $100 million.


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NY Times calls out Trump’s broken promises on creating a manufacturing renaissance in America

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When President Trump spoke at a 2018 groundbreaking ceremony for the Foxconn plant in Wisconsin, he promised the plant would provide thousands of jobs and would be the "eighth wonder of the world." But as the New York Times' Alan Rappeport points out, the company has hired "less than a quarter of the 2,080 workers it was expected to employ last year and invested just $300 million, rather than the expected $3.3 billion."

"Foxconn’s failure to create the kind of factory powerhouse that Mr. Trump described demonstrates how the president’s promise of an American manufacturing renaissance has not always resulted in the pledged jobs or economic investment," Rappeport writes. "Mr. Trump has threatened companies like General Motors, Harley-Davidson and Carrier with backbreaking taxes and boycotts if they moved manufacturing abroad, often cajoling job promises out of those firms. But in many cases, those pledges went unfulfilled once Mr. Trump’s attention shifted elsewhere and market realities could not be ignored."

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2020 Election

George Conway uses reverse rhetoric to rip Trump in WaPo: ‘I believe in the president, now more than ever’

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In a link-driven, satirical opinion piece for The Washington Post Monday, conservative attorney and Lincoln Project co-founder George Conway ripped Trump supporters with his reverse rhetoric by writing a parody of what one might say in defense of the president with just over a week until Election Day.

"I believe, more than ever, in the president," Conway began his post. "I believe Sleepy Joe Biden and that 'monster' Kamala D. Harris would turn America into a 'socialist hellhole,' and we’d all have 'to speak Chinese.'"

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In rural America, resentment over COVID-19 shutdowns is colliding with rising case numbers

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As COVID-19 spreads through rural America, new infection numbers are rising to peaks not seen during this pandemic and pushing hospitals to their limits. Many towns are experiencing their first major outbreaks, but that doesn’t mean rural communities had previously been spared the devastating impacts of the pandemic.

Infection rates in rural and frontier communities ebbed and flowed during the first seven months, often showing up in pockets linked to meat packing plants, nursing homes or prisons.

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