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Boulder-sized sunfish washes ashore in Australia

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A boulder-sized fish of a kind known to “sink yachts” has washed up on an Australian beach.

The 1.8 metre (six feet) specimen — believed to be a Mola Mola, or ocean sunfish — came ashore near the mouth of the Murray River in South Australia at the weekend.

The enormous creature is distinct for both its size and peculiar shape featuring a flattened body and fins.

The fish can weigh up to 2.5 tons (2,200 kilogrammes), according to National Geographic.

A photo circulating on social media showed two people on a beach standing over the giant specimen, which had died.

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“The amount of news and media from all over the world wanting to report it has been on another level,” Linette Grzelak, who posted the image to Facebook, told AFP.

“Never expected this.”

South Australian Museum fish collection manager Ralph Foster said the fish was actually at the smaller end of the scale for the species.

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                                           Courtesy of Linette Grzelak/AFP / Handout Experts say this enormous specimen was actually only average size and the species can grow up to 2.5 tons (2,200 kgs)

It earned its name for basking in the sun near the ocean’s surface, but is also known to dive several hundred metres (feet) into the depths, he said.

“I’ve actually had a good look at it, we get three species here and this is actually the rarest one in South Australian waters,” Foster told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).

“They can get a lot bigger… it’s probably an average-sized one, they can get nearly twice as big as that,” he added.

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Mola Mola have also been known to damage vessels, Foster added.

“We get a lot of them hit by boats and some of them are so large they actually sink yachts,” he said.

“We know very little about them, it’s only in the last few years that technology has allowed us to start learning about them.

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“They are amazing things, they really are.”


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Here are 3 things Americans must hear from Mueller’s testimony: Democratic senator

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No one can say with certainty what former special counsel Robert Mueller will tell the American people when he testifies before the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees on Wednesday.

But on Monday, Sen. Mazie Hirono (D-HI) told CNN's Wolf Blitzer the broad strokes of what Mueller will be expected to say — and what the American people should be listening for if they are not yet convinced President Donald Trump has committed impeachable offenses.

"Do you think there are Americans out there who still haven't made up their mind on this issue of impeachment, obstruction of justice, collusion and all of that?" Blitzer asked her. "Have the American people moved on?"

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New Orleans funk icon and co-founder of the Neville Brothers Art Neville dies at 81

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Art Neville, a New Orleans funk legend and co-founder of the Neville Brothers, has died, his brother said Monday. He was 81 years old.

The singer and keyboard player who answered to the sobriquet "Poppa Funk" was well known as the voice of the "Mardi Gras Mambo," which quickly became a mainstay of his home city's famed carnival after he first played it at age 17.

"Artie Poppa Funk Neville you are loved dearly by every one who knew you. Love always your lil' big brother AARON (we ask for privacy during this time of mourning)," his brother, soul singer Aaron Neville, tweeted.

His death follows that of another famed New Orleans musician, the blues pianist Dr. John, who died last month.

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Native Hawaiians continue protest a week after telescope construction was set to start on sacred lan

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Indigenous protectors of Mauna Kea oppose the $1.4 billion project

A week after construction was scheduled to resume on a long-delayed $1.4 billion telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea—a dormant volcano on Hawaii's Big Island—thousands of Native Hawaiians who consider the mountain sacred continued to protest the planned observatory.

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