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After first mass shooting in decades New Zealand Prime Minister promises immediate action

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Before Thursday the last mass shooting in New Zealand took place decades ago, in 1997. In response to the horrific terror attacks overnight that left 49 people slaughtered and 48 or more hospitalized, the Prime Minister of New Zealand wasted no time promising action.

“I can tell you one thing right now. Our gun laws will change,” Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, 38, told reporters Friday afternoon (U.S. Eastern time), as the New Zealand website The Spinoff reported.

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“I want to speak specifically about the firearms used in this terrorist act,” she said, clearly labeling it terrorism, which President Trump now three times has refused to do. The suspects are believed to be white nationalists and white supremacists, the victims were slaughtered while praying in mosques.

“I’m advised that there were five guns used by the primary perpetrator. There were two semi-automatic weapons, and two shotguns. The offender was in possession of a gun licence,” she noted.

“There have been attempts to change our laws in 2005, 2012 and after an inquiry in 2017. Now is the time for change.”

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The Atlantic notes Thursday’s terror attack was “the deadliest shooting in the modern history of New Zealand, a country where gun violence is rare and annual gun homicides don’t usually reach the double digits.”

In 1997, six people were murdered in a mass shooting by a man with a history of deep mental illness. In 1990 a gunman shot and killed 13 people.

“After that shooting, the country amended its laws to limit firearm access. Since then, New Zealand has experienced approximately four incidents of gun violence in which more than five people were killed.”

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Instead of saying, “now is not the time to talk about gun violence,” the Prime Minister announced, less than 24 hours after the attack, “I can tell you one thing right now. Our gun laws will change.”

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White losers have always tried to punish black election winners — Mississippi case just the latest example

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The recent experience of Hester Jackson-McCray, a black Democrat who narrowly defeated a Republican incumbent in a Mississippi statehouse race, echoes America's long history of criminalizing black politicians.

GOP legislator Ashley Henley, who lost by 14 votes, asked the Republican-controlled statehouse to overturn the results based on her claims of election irregularities, and that's not the first time in U.S. history that whites have sought to punish black politicians for winning, reported The Guardian.

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Trump is wallowing in ‘self-pity’ even though McConnell promised to protect him: Morning Joe

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Appearing on MNBC's "Morning Joe," New York Times reporter Peter Baker said Donald Trump is wallowing in "self-pity" that fluctuates with "combativeness" as he worries about the effect being impeached will have on his legacy.

Speaking with host Joe Scarborough, Baker filled in the blanks from his Times report, saying the president is obsessed with the impeachment hearings and Senate trial still to come.

Asked by host Scarborough about Trump's "humiliation," Baker said, "He can count on the Republican-controlled Senate to hold the trial where he seems almost certain to be acquitted, or at least see the charges dismissed in some fashion."

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WATCH LIVE: House holds historic vote on the impeachment of Donald Trump

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After a 14-hour House Judiciary Committee Thursday hearing considering the impeachment of Donald Trump, Democrats and Republicans on the committee will reconvene once again Friday morning where they are expected to finally vote on the articles of impeachment before sending them to the House floor for a full vote scheduled for next week.

According to NBC, "In a surprise move, Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler delayed the vote until Friday morning at 10 a.m. after more than 14 hours of debate. There were five votes on Thursday: one to eliminate the first article on abuse of power, a second to strike a reference to former Vice President Joe Biden, a third to note the aid withheld from Ukraine was eventually released, a fourth to strike entire second amendment on obstruction of Congress and a fifth to strike the last lines in each article. All were voted down and along party lines."

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