Quantcast
Connect with us

Paul Krugman explains the ‘creepy’ and racist assumptions in Trump’s new economic report

Published

on

- Commentary

Each year, the White House releases an Economic Report of the President, detailing the administration’s view of the country and the administration’s goals to address ongoing economic trends. As the Washington Post’s Catherine Rampell noted, this year’s report stands out for it’s distinctly partisan — and honestly somewhat delusional — focus on “socialism” as a scare tactic about Democratic policy ideas.

ADVERTISEMENT

For a document that’s supposed to focus on the current and future economic potential of the United States, it spends a bizarre amount of time talking about agricultural policy under Mao Zedong and the Soviet Union.

But this isn’t the only bizarre and disturbing aspect of the report.

On Sunday, Paul Krugman pointed to another portion of the document that seems to rely on racist assumptions:

ADVERTISEMENT

(See page 415 in the report.)

“Will someone explain to me how this isn’t racist?” asked Krugman.

The passage following the graph explained:

ADVERTISEMENT

Figure 8-7’s red bars show the per capita income of people with Nordic ancestry living in the U.S., and who therefore are not subject to Nordic tax rates and regulations.72 They have incomes of about 30 percent more than the average American and, based also on the red bars, about 50 percent more income than the average in their home country. This suggests that the incomes of Nordic people are not lower because, apart from public policy, low incomes are somehow cultural.

Krugman noted that the report tries to suggest that it’s comparing Nordic people to people of Nordic ancestry in the United States because it somehow holds “culture” as a constant. But, of course, it doesn’t constant. The bulk of Nordic immigration dropped off in the early 20th century. Since that time, the links between Nordic culture and the descendants of Nordic immigrants now living in the United States has largely been swamped by cultural changes in both regions.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I don’t see any way to read this except as asserting that since blond white people are relatively well off in America, they should have the same incomes everywhere,” said Krugman. “Is this really where you want to go?”

The reference brings to mind one of the low points in the administration’s immigration debates in the last few years (though there have been many). According to multiple reports, President Donald Trump referred to immigrants leaving Haiti and African nations as coming from “shithole countries” — a remark that exposed the blatant racism of his view on immigration.

Instead, he reportedly suggested, the United States should bring in more people from Norway.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

GOP now stands for ‘Gang of Putin’: Conservative slams Republican ‘affinity’ for Russian president

Published

on

For aging Gen-Xers and Baby Boomers who are old enough to remember the Cold War, the admiration that the alt-right has for Russian President Vladimir Putin — a former KGB agent — is quite ironic. And that irony isn’t lost on conservative Washington Post columnist Max Boot, who is highly critical of President Donald Trump’s pro-Putin outlook in his December 4 column.

Boot, now 50, was born in Moscow on September 12, 1969 — back when Moscow was still part of the Soviet Union. But he was still a kid when his parents fled the Soviet Union and moved to Los Angeles, where he grew up. The Soviet Union ceased to exist in the early 1990s, and Putin is a right-wing authoritarian — not a communist. Boot, however, emphasizes in his column that Russia is still no friend of the United States.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump’s promises on manufacturing jobs have collapsed — all thanks to his trade war

Published

on

One of President Donald Trump's biggest promises during the 2016 campaign was to bring manufacturing jobs back to the United States.

However, as Axios reports, the manufacturing sector of the economy is in a major slump and much of it can be attributed to the president's trade wars against multiple countries.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump’s ‘deep state’ conspiracy theories are going down the drain — thanks to his own appointees

Published

on

President Donald Trump's insistence that the entire probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election was a setup by nefarious law enforcement agents has been dealt a significant blow in recent days.

According to multiple reports, Inspector General Michael Horowitz's report on the origins of the Russia probe will conclude that there was sufficient reason for the FBI to open up an investigation into the Trump campaign given the knowledge they had in the summer of 2016.

Continue Reading