Quantcast
Connect with us

Paul Krugman explains the ‘creepy’ and racist assumptions in Trump’s new economic report

Published

on

- Commentary

Each year, the White House releases an Economic Report of the President, detailing the administration’s view of the country and the administration’s goals to address ongoing economic trends. As the Washington Post’s Catherine Rampell noted, this year’s report stands out for it’s distinctly partisan — and honestly somewhat delusional — focus on “socialism” as a scare tactic about Democratic policy ideas.

ADVERTISEMENT

For a document that’s supposed to focus on the current and future economic potential of the United States, it spends a bizarre amount of time talking about agricultural policy under Mao Zedong and the Soviet Union.

But this isn’t the only bizarre and disturbing aspect of the report.

On Sunday, Paul Krugman pointed to another portion of the document that seems to rely on racist assumptions:

ADVERTISEMENT

(See page 415 in the report.)

“Will someone explain to me how this isn’t racist?” asked Krugman.

The passage following the graph explained:

ADVERTISEMENT

Figure 8-7’s red bars show the per capita income of people with Nordic ancestry living in the U.S., and who therefore are not subject to Nordic tax rates and regulations.72 They have incomes of about 30 percent more than the average American and, based also on the red bars, about 50 percent more income than the average in their home country. This suggests that the incomes of Nordic people are not lower because, apart from public policy, low incomes are somehow cultural.

Krugman noted that the report tries to suggest that it’s comparing Nordic people to people of Nordic ancestry in the United States because it somehow holds “culture” as a constant. But, of course, it doesn’t constant. The bulk of Nordic immigration dropped off in the early 20th century. Since that time, the links between Nordic culture and the descendants of Nordic immigrants now living in the United States has largely been swamped by cultural changes in both regions.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I don’t see any way to read this except as asserting that since blond white people are relatively well off in America, they should have the same incomes everywhere,” said Krugman. “Is this really where you want to go?”

The reference brings to mind one of the low points in the administration’s immigration debates in the last few years (though there have been many). According to multiple reports, President Donald Trump referred to immigrants leaving Haiti and African nations as coming from “shithole countries” — a remark that exposed the blatant racism of his view on immigration.

Instead, he reportedly suggested, the United States should bring in more people from Norway.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Florida reports record number of coronavirus deaths one month ahead of GOP convention

Published

on

Florida, the new epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States, reported a record 156 COVID-19 deaths on Thursday and nearly 14,000 new infections.

The total number of virus cases in the "Sunshine State" has now surpassed 315,000 and there have been 4,782 deaths, according to Florida Department of Health figures.

The reporting of 156 virus deaths in the state in a 24-hour period surpasses the previous high of 132 deaths announced just two days earlier.

Florida is now reporting more COVID-19 cases daily than any other state in the country. California and Texas are next with about 10,000 new cases a day.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

GOP officials admit 2020 platform is basically whatever’s on Trump’s Twitter account

Published

on

President Donald Trump has shaped the Republican Party into his own image in less than four years on the job, and that doesn't seem likely to change anytime soon.

Nearly half of the House Republicans on the job when Trump took office in 2017 have either retired, resigned, been defeated or are retiring in 2020, and many of the GOP newcomers are devoted Trump loyalists, reported Politico.

“Whether the president wins or loses, his policy views and style have firmly taken over the Republican Party — nationalism and white grievance, those kinds of things,” said Matt Moore, former chairman of South Carolina's GOP. “I don’t think that Trumpy politics will be leaving the stage anytime soon.”

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Coronavirus data disappears from CDC dashboard after Trump hijacks info

Published

on

The Trump administration on Tuesday forced all hospitals and states to make a significant and immediate change in how they report coronavirus patient data, hijacking the information to be funneled into the Dept. of Health and Human Services.

Experts warned the move could allow the administration to politicize the data, hide it, be less transparent, all of which interferes in the real-time usage of information to fight the coronavirus pandemic.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image