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Conservative names Republicans who have spouted the same claims made by New Zealand shooter about immigrants

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President Donald Trump, speaks to the media in the Rose Garden at the White House after meeting with Democrats to discuss the ongoing partial government shutdown. ( Michael Candelori / Shutterstock.com)

Conservative Max Boot linked the connection between President Donald Trump’s hateful rhetoric  to  the New Zealand shooter in a column for The Washington Post.

The shooter, who has been a identified as 28-year-old man, but his name has not been made public, released a long manifesto that detailed his views on hate towards Muslim and immigrants. Boot said that there is a common thread of ideologies that result in domestic attacks and said the New Zealand shooting was not an isolated incident.

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“In other words, when these are hate crimes rooted in pathologies shared by many others, rather than random emanations of a diseased mind,” he said.

Boot explained that extremists attack are not treated equally, and argued that “right-wing violence” should be treated with just as much seriousness as other forms of violence.

“Yet we do not treat all hate crimes equally. For decades, we have been understandably focused on attacks by Muslim extremists. I say understandably because 9/11 was the worst terrorist attack ever, and it was only a prelude of the horrors to come,” Boot wrote.

He added, “But a focus on Islamist violence should not distract us from the growing threat of right-wing violence.”

“The Anti-Defamation League reports that in the United States, ‘right-wing extremists collectively have been responsible for more than 70 percent of the 427 extremist-related killings over the past 10 years’, far outnumbering those committed by left-wing extremists or domestic Islamist extremists,” he said.

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He then drew comparisons between the New Zealand shooter’s rhetoric to that of King’s.

“The alleged Christchurch shooter’s loathsome manifesto is called ‘The Great Replacement,’ a common trope of white supremacists. He complained of ‘mass immigration’ and “higher fertility rates of the immigrants” leading to “the complete racial and cultural replacement of the European people,” he said.

He added, “Does any of this sound familiar? It should. Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) has spoken of his own fears of the ‘great replacement.’ Stephen K. Bannon, President Trump’s former counselor, has voiced admiration for a racist French novel called ‘The Camp of the Saints’ that imagines France being overrun by nonwhite newcomers. Trump himself has expressed support for Le Pen; said: ‘Islam hates us’; praised white supremacists as ‘very fine people’; and warned of an ‘invasion’ of undocumented immigrants.”

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Even after the New Zealand shooting, Trump failed to condemn the spread of white nationalism and said the ideology was only believed by a “small group of people.”

Boot called out Trump’s rhetoric as “deeply disturbing.”

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“It is well past time for the president to accept responsibility for his rhetoric and to tone it down. Because the wrong words can inspire the worst acts,” he said.

Read the entire column here.


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2020 Election

Trump officials could face criminal charges for USPS sabotage — and the president may not be able to pardon them

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Members of the Trump administration could face legal jeopardy over efforts to sabotage U.S. Postal Service operations to interfere with the 2020 presidential elections.

"Rep. Bill Pascrell, Jr. (D-NJ) made a criminal referral to the New Jersey Attorney General on Friday night, asking him to impanel a grand jury to look at possible breach of state election laws by President Trump, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy and others for 'their accelerating arson of the post office,' he said. Alarming headlines have emerged in recent days as many states prepare to facilitate widespread mail balloting due to the coronavirus pandemic. President Trump openly admitted he was withholding federal aid from the postal service to prevent mail-in voting, and USPS has notified 46 states and D.C. that it will struggle to deliver some mail ballots on time," The Daily Beast reported Friday.

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Maddow reveals how one state stood up to Trump’s USPS cuts — and won

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MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow's opening segment on Friday focused on a positive story of political pressure stopping one of the Trump administration's attacks on the U.S. Postal Service.

Maddow reported how NBC Montana reporter Maritsa Georgiou had doggedly reported on the removal of postal boxes in Missoula, where she is based. Missoula has been a long-time Democratic Party stronghold.

Montana has a competitive U.S. Senate election in 2020, with Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock challenging first-term Republican Sen. Steve Daines.

As Georgiou chased the story, she learned there were also plans to remove boxes in the battleground of Billings. And more planned for the blue town of Bozeman. And other towns.

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2020 Election

Pepsi joins the chorus of people dunking on Tucker Carlson over Kamala Harris

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The Pepsi soda company mocked Fox News personality Tucker Carlson on Friday evening.

On Tuesday, Carlson flipped out after a guest attempted to teach him how to pronounce the name of Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), who is running for vice president on Joe Biden's ticket.

Video of the exchange was posted on Twitter by Nikki McCann Ramirez, a researcher at the watchdog group Media Matters for America.

Tucker Carlson loses it when a guest corrects his pronunciation of Kamala Harris's name pic.twitter.com/1fHIrPGuwN

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