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Trump vetoes lawmakers’ measure against border wall

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President Donald Trump on Friday vetoed a measure to terminate his emergency declaration over a border wall, striking back at Republican and Democratic lawmakers who opposed the controversial move with the first veto of his presidency.

While Congress is unlikely to muster the votes to override the veto, the rebuke from some members of his own party left Trump politically wounded, at least temporarily, as immigration and his planned wall along the U.S. southern border become a flashpoint again in the 2020 presidential campaign.

The bipartisan vote in the Senate on Thursday approving the measure was a slap at Trump over his decision to circumvent Congress and take money already designated for other programs to pay for his barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Twelve of Trump’s fellow Republicans joined Democrats to pass the measure to end the emergency declaration.

Before issuing the veto, Trump again said there was a tremendous national emergency, while U.S. Attorney General William Barr said the action the president had taken was legal.

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The emergency declaration is being challenged in court as an unconstitutional usurpation of Congress’ power of the purse.

Trump was flanked by border officials and people who have had family members killed by someone who was in the United States illegally as he issued the veto during an Oval Office signing ceremony.

The president has said he wants a wall to prevent immigrants from crossing into the United States illegally. Democrats deny there is an emergency at the border, saying border crossings are at a four-decade low.

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Trump thanked Republican senators who voted for his declaration in a Twitter post earlier on Friday. “Watch, when you get back to your State, they will LOVE you more than ever before!” he said.

The president made a border wall a central promise of his 2016 campaign for the White House. He initially insisted that Mexico would pay for the wall but it has declined to do so. Last year, Trump forced a government shutdown over an impasse with Congress over funding for the barrier.

When a deal to prevent another shutdown did not give him the funding he requested, Trump declared a national emergency, redirecting funds that were allocated for other projects to build the barrier instead.

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Reporting by Jeff Mason and Roberta Rampton in Washington; editing by Dan Grebler and James Dalgleish


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected]. Send news tips to: [email protected].
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US fake meat firm mounts challenge to legal restrictions

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A US firm that sells turkey-flavored tofu has taken legal action against a law that prohibits use of the word "meat" to describe its products, amid a political backlash to the growing popularity of meat substitutes.

Tofurky is contesting a law, due to take effect in the southern state of Arkansas this week, which would fine companies $1,000 per violation for plant-based food products that were labeled as alternatives to meat.

In a lawsuit filed Monday and backed by the powerful American Civil Liberties Union, the firm said the move violated its constitutional rights to freedom of speech.

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UK PM contender Johnson’s biggest controversies

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During a decades-spanning career as a journalist and politician, likely next British prime minister Boris Johnson has stoked plenty of controversy.

Here are some of the most contentious episodes in the life of the bombastic 55-year-old former foreign secretary and London mayor, widely expected to become Britain's new leader this week:

- Fired for lying -

After graduating from Oxford University, Johnson landed a trainee reporter job at The Times newspaper in 1987.

But he was dismissed within a year for concocting a quote in an article about king Edward II and the monarch's suspected gay lover.

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Want to meet with the Trump Administration? Donald Trump Jr.’s hunting buddy Tommy Hicks can help

Tommy Hicks Jr. isn’t in government, but he’s a longtime pal of the president’s son. That has put him in the room when the administration talks China and 5G policy, and it lets him help others — including one friend who had $143 million riding on the outcome.

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Over the past two years, the Trump administration has been grappling with how to handle the transition to the next generation of mobile broadband technology. With spending expected to run into hundreds of billions of dollars, the administration views it as an ultra-high-stakes competition between U.S. and Chinese companies, with enormous implications both for technology and for national security. Top officials from a raft of departments have been meeting to hash out the best approach.

ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for The Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox.

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