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Whether a sitting president can be indicted should be reexamined: former federal prosecutor

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Former federal prosecutor Glenn Kirschner has reached a point that he thinks the policy of not indicting a sitting president should be readjusted for modern times.

In a PoliticsNation panel discussion, focused on Rep. Jerry Nadler’s (D-NY) suggestion that he would be requesting documents from at least 60 people connected to President Donald Trump as part of broadening the investigation into possible crimes committed while running for office or while president.

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“He has got legal exposure on so many fronts,” said Kirschner. “Whether it is his fake charitable organization, his continuing criminal enterprise of the Trump Organization, whether it is an inauguration run amok, it looks like, taking illegal, foreign donations and doling out or promising goodness knows what to those people who donated. And it’s his presidency.”

He noted that prosecutors put together all of the pieces to help create a picture of illegality.

“But once that puzzle is assembled, it shows a pretty compelling picture of a president and an organization and an administration that has just sort of run roughshod over the rule of law,” Kirschner explained. “And if we had more time, we could actually sort of assemble that puzzle and go through all of the different facts and circumstances that make it clear that this president has no respect for the rule of law, and I think justice is coming, and I think Bob Mueller, when he issues his report, when he returns what I am certain will be a large conspiracy indictment based on what he finds with respect to campaign and Russian collusion, I think everything will come home to roost.”

Watch his comments below:

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‘Hell no’: Texans join forces to stop Trump from stealing their land

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President Donald Trump's pledge to build a wall at the southern border with Mexico has been a huge winner with his base. But there is one group of people who are not happy: the Texans who actually live in the region where the wall would be built.

According to the Washington Post, many people in the region have no intention of letting the federal government seize their land to construct the wall, like Afghanistan war veteran Salvador Castillo of Brownsville, who received a letter from officials demanding unlimited access to and use of his land, which gradually escalated into a lawsuit.

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Pearl Harbor veteran to be interred on sunken ship

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It was an attack that shaped history, leaving more than 2,400 Americans dead and forcing the United States to enter a war it had been reluctant to join.

On Saturday, the 78th anniversary of the 1941 sneak attack by Japan on Pearl Harbor, the remains of one of the survivors of the assault will be interred on his sunken ship, the USS Arizona.

Lauren Bruner, who was among the last sailors rescued from the Arizona as it exploded into flames and sank, died in September at age 98.

He had expressed in years past his wish to be buried alongside fellow sailors who died on that fateful day.

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Suspect swallows poison after verdict in French murder case

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The suspect for the rape and murder of a young woman in northern France almost two decades ago was under guard in hospital Saturday after he swallowed pesticide in an apparent suicide bid following his conviction.

Willy Bardon, on trial over the murder of Elodie Kulik in 2002 in a case that has attracted strong interest in France for years, ingested the substance at the courthouse in the northern city of Amiens late on Friday.

Bardon had been sentenced to 30 years jail for kidnapping and holding a person against their will followed by death. He was however acquitted of murder.

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