Quantcast
Connect with us

Bush speechwriter hammers Trump for his lack of patriotism and ‘nonexistent military record’ — and urges Dems to use that against him

Published

on

Democrats should run on the issue of patriotism in 2020, a former George W. Bush speechwriter wrote in The Washington Post on Thursday.

Michael Gerson had harsh words for President Donald Trump.

“My personal recommendation: Relentlessly turning the president’s claim of authenticity against him, until his defining public attributes become national jokes. Every part of Trump’s appeal is fraudulent. His lies are not the filigree; they are the foundation,” he wrote.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The man who promised to drain the swamp imported alligators such as Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen,” he noted. “The man who claimed he would bring business skills to the White House has cultivated a cloud of squabbling chaos around him. His management style — rewarding toadies and punishing honest disagreement — would push the average lemonade stand into early bankruptcy.”

In Gerson’s mind, patriotism could be a top issue as Trump seeks re-election.

“And, most disturbingly, the president’s defiant nationalism is strangely lacking in basic patriotism. He is quick to question others’ loyalty — ‘Maybe you shouldn’t be in the country’ — but remarkably slow to demonstrate loyalty of his own,” Gerson wrote.

“Trump supporters must believe that deep down he is a true patriot. But the public evidence for this is scarce,” he noted. “It was certainly not evident during his nonexistent military career. It could not be proved by his casual slanders against the country. When told that, “[Vladimir] Putin’s a killer,” Trump responded: ‘There are a lot of killers. . . . You think our country’s so innocent?’ When asked about Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s crackdown on dissent, Trump answered: ‘When the world looks at how bad the United States is, and then we go and talk about civil liberties, I don’t think we’re a very good messenger.'”

“I never imagined that the party of Ronald Reagan would cede the ground of patriotism. But in the Trump era, Democrats have a chance to seize it,” he added.

ADVERTISEMENT

Read the full column.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

So long, Steve King: 9-term white supremacist GOP congressman from Iowa loses primary

Published

on

U.S. Congressman Steve King, a nine-term Republican of Iowa, has just lost his primary to a GOP challenger. It's a huge fall from grace: In 2014 The Des Moines Register labeled the former earth-moving company founder a "presidential kingmaker."

But his racist, white nationalist, white supremacist, anti-immigrant, anti-Semitic, homophobic, transphobic, biphobic remarks and disturbing ties to far right radical European politicians – including one he endorsed who has ties to a neo-Nazi, finally caught up with him.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

When the president’s son-in-law truly was a great success

Published

on

For many Americans, the idea of the president tasking his son-in-law with solving national, even international, crises, seems problematic, if not absurd. But it happened once before and turned out to be the kind of “great success story” our current first family wants us to believe in again. Slightly over a century ago, as the US mobilized for the First World War, the nation faced devastating breakdowns of its financial and transport systems. In response, President Woodrow Wilson leaned heavily on his talented and experienced Treasury Secretary, William McAdoo, who just happened to be his son-in-law. Looking back at this episode tells us a lot about what makes for successful emergency management at the highest levels of government.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Here are 7 ways Donald Trump is just like Henry Ford — and why that’s not good for American democracy

Published

on

On May 21, speaking at the Ford Motor Company’s Rawsonville plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan, Donald Trump paid his latest homage to Henry Ford, lauding the family’s “good bloodlines” with Ford’s great grandson sitting in the front row.

Ford, like Trump, was obsessed with bloodlines—with the idea that race and genetic origins determined who counted as the “best people.”

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image