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WATCH: GOP governor reams the RNC for insisting ‘100% loyalty to dear leader’ Donald Trump

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Larry Hogan, the Republican governor of Maryland, on Tuesday called President Donald Trump “dear leader,” a title normally reserved for North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un.

While speaking at an event in New Hampshire, Hogan hinted that he may throw his hat into the presidential race. The governor said that he has “no real timeline” for deciding.

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A member of the audience, however, noted that the Republican National Committee (RNC) has already thrown its support behind Trump, giving other GOP candidates little chance to compete for the White House.

“I was pretty critical of that,” Hogan replied. “And not that the Republican National Committee doesn’t have the right to support a sitting president, but to change the rules and to insist 100% loyalty to the dear leader, it doesn’t sound very much like the Republican Party that I grew up in, working for Ronald Reagan and supporting George Bush.”

The governor said that he is “for a return to a more traditional Republican Party.”

“Changing the rules and stifling debate and demanding that we can’t even have an open discussion about the future of the party in the country is to me very short sighted and wrong move for the Republican National Committee,” he added. “It does not represent the average voter, however, it’s a small group of people in Washington that comes from — to make the decisions in there. Not really representative of the average person.”

Watch the video below from C-SPAN.

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2020 Election

Florida seniors are ‘highly susceptible’ to coronavirus — which could hurt Trump’s reelection chances

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On Monday, The Washington Post examined the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on older voters' politics, and in particular how it is hurting President Donald Trump with the critical demographic in Florida — a state that is almost mandatory for the president to win for a second term.

"While Democrats have worried about Biden’s struggles to excite younger voters, older voters who are upset with the president are poised to be potentially more influential in November, especially in swing states whose populations skew their way, like Florida, Pennsylvania, Arizona, Michigan and Wisconsin," reported Jenna Johnson and Lori Rozsa. "In Florida, more than 20 percent of those who voted in the 2016 election were over age 65, according to exit polls. In 2016, Trump won the Florida senior vote by a 17-point margin over Clinton, according to exit polls. The state ranks as one Trump must almost certainly win to insure his victory, while Biden has other paths to the White House."

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2020 Election

Lawmakers discussing possibility that ‘freaked out’ Trump won’t accept election loss

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President Donald Trump's increasing attacks on election integrity have raised new alarms about his efforts to delegitimize the results in November.

Just as he did in 2016, Trump has been flinging baseless accusations of "rigged" elections and has, as president, threatened to withhold funding from Michigan and Nevada for going ahead with plans to allow voting by mail during the coronavirus pandemic, reported Politico.

"He is planting the seeds for delegitimizing the election if he loses," said Vanita Gupta, a former head of Justice Department’s civil rights division under President Barack Obama. "It’s from the playbook. It’ll get more intense as he gets more freaked out."

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2020 Election

‘Un-American’ anti-lockdown protesters hammered by Army veteran for appropriating military gear to make their point

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In a Memorial Day column for the Washington Post, military vet Drew Garza -- who served three tours in Iraq and Afghanistan among other deployments -- hammered anti-lockdown protesters who have appropriated a quasi-military style of dress while sometimes carrying "un-American" flags at lockdown rallies.

According to the U.S. Army vet who is now a Tillman scholar at George Washington University, protesters who adorn themselves in military-style garb while carrying high-powered weapons to protest stay-at-home orders designed to stem the spread of the coronavirus pandemic is a personal affront to those who have actually served.

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