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Bill allowing public schools to teach ‘Biblical content’ to understand ‘public policy’ becomes law

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Civil rights group warns new law is “part of Project Blitz, a coordinated attempt by the Religious Right to enshrine Christian nationalism in our schools.”

Georgia Republican Governor Brian Kemp has signed into law a bill that will allow the teaching of the New and Old Testaments of the Bible in public schools. SB 83, as passed, says it’s designed to teach “knowledge of biblical content, characters, poetry, and narratives that are prerequisites to understanding contemporary society and culture, including literature, art, music, mores, oratory, and public policy.”

It’s clear the bill’s authors believe America is based on the Christian Bible, given the inclusion of “public policy” in the legislation’s text.

But earlier drafts of the bill, which appear to go back at least as far as 2007, expose a more insidious intent.

“The purpose of such courses shall be to accommodate the rights and desires of those teachers and students who wish to teach and study the Old and New Testaments,” a portion of the bill’s now struck language reads.

The bill does caution that the courses must be “taught in an objective and nondevotional manner with no attempt made to indoctrinate students as to either the truth or falsity of the biblical materials or texts from other religious or cultural traditions.”

But another section of the bill opens the door wide for local school boards to teach the Bible as they please, “provided, however, that no state funds” are used for those classes.

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SB 83 makes these classes elective.

Meanwhile, cvil rights groups advocating for separation of church and state opposed the bill.

“Our public schools should not act like Sunday schools, but that’s exactly what this bill invites,” Americans United warned earlier this year.

And they warn SB 83 is part of a larger religious attack on America:

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Impressionism’s ‘forgotten woman’ shines in new Paris show

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The first major show of Berthe Morisot's paintings in France in nearly 80 years puts the forgotten woman of Impressionism back at the centre of the movement she helped found.

One damning review of the first exhibition by the group that would revolutionise art blasted that it was no more than "five or six lunatics of which one is a woman ...[whose] feminine grace is maintained amid the outpourings of a delirious mind."

That 1874 show included such soon-to-be art giants as Monet and Manet, whose brother Eugene later married Morisot.

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Scientists find earliest clues of Parkinson’s in brain

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Scientists said Thursday they had found the earliest signs of Parkinson's disease in the brain years before patients show any symptoms, a discovery that could eventually lead to better screening for at-risk people.

Parkinson's, a neurodegenerative disorder that causes patients movement and cognitive problems, is estimated to effect up to 10 million people worldwide.

It is diagnosed by a build-up in the brain of a specific protein, a-synuclein, the cause of which is unclear.

However some people are born with a genetic mutation that makes them almost certain to develop the disease at some stage in their life.

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‘Out of his depth’: Trump holding back on Iran because he understands it’s harder than ‘swinging’ at a primary foe

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During a discussion on news that Iran has shot down a U.S. drone over international airspace on CNN, New York Times White House correspondent Maggie Haberman explained that Donald Trump is in no rush to respond militarily because, for once, he knows he's "out of his depth."

Speaking with hosts John Berman and Alisyn Camerota, Habermann said that the president will likely get advice from national security adviser John Bolton to push back militarily, but that Trump doesn't seem interested in taking on as large a task as going to war.

"He usually responds to a provocation when it's a smaller thing that he can punch and knock down," Haberman explained. "He's pretty aware he can't actually do that with Iran. So I don't think you're going to see the typical, you know, as if he were swinging back at a primary foe. I think he is going to actually be a little more careful in what he says."

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