Quantcast
Connect with us

Bill Barr gets cornered for misleading Congress about Mueller’s concerns — and offers a dubious excuse

Published

on

Democratic Sen. Patrick Leahy of Vermont went after Attorney General William Barr with a vengeance during his Wednesday morning testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Barr was questioned about the letter he sent to Congress on March 24, when the attorney general offered an assessment of the findings of special counsel Robert Mueller’s final report for the Russia investigation. Mueller has disagreed with Barr’s characterization of his report, and Leahy addressed that disagreement when questioning Barr.

ADVERTISEMENT

Leahy told Barr that “contrary to what you said on April 9,” Mueller “wrote to you” on March 27 “expressing very specific concerns that your March 24 letter” failed to capture the “context, nature and substance of his report.”

Leahy continued, “What really struck me: Mr. Mueller wrote that your letter threatened to undermine a central purpose for which the Department (of Justice) appointed the special counsel.”

Leahy asked Barr why, on April 9, he said he was unaware of the “concerns” being expressed by Mueller’s team “when, in fact, you had heard those concerns directly from Mr. Mueller two weeks before.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Barr responded that he “was not aware of any challenge to the accuracy of the findings.” Leahy replied that Barr seemed to “have learned the filibuster rules even better than senators do,” implying that Barr was being evasive.

After Leahy repeated his question, the attorney general responded, “I talked directly to Bob Mueller, not members of his team. And even though I did not know what was being referred to, and Mueller had never told me that the expression of the findings was inaccurate. But I did then volunteer that I thought they were talking about the desire to have more information put out. But it wasn’t my purpose to put out more information.”

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

No let-up in French strikes as fresh turmoil hits weekend

Published

on

The most serious nationwide strike to hit France in years caused new weekend travel turmoil on Saturday, with unions warning the walkouts would last well into next week.

The challenge thrown to President Emmanuel Macron over his plans for radical pension reform has seen hundreds of thousands take to the streets and key transport services brought to a standstill.

The strikes, which began on Thursday, have recalled the winter of 1995, when three weeks of huge stoppages forced a social policy U-turn by the then-government.

Unions have vowed a second series of mass demonstrations nationwide on Tuesday after big rallies on Thursday and there is expected to be little easing of the transport freezes over the coming days.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

PG&E agrees to $13.5 billion payout for deadly California fires

Published

on

California's Pacific Gas and Electric will pay $13.5 billion to settle lawsuits over its role in a series of wildfires that killed scores of people and destroyed thousands of homes, the utility giant said Friday.

Faulty PG&E powerlines were blamed for sparking last year's so-called Camp Fire in northern California -- the deadliest in the state's history -- that left 86 people dead.

Outdated facilities including vulnerable wooden poles and failure to deforest land surrounding high-voltage transmission lines were blamed for the inferno, prompting accusations the San Francisco-based firm had put profit before safety.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Russia likely listened to Trump when he used unsecured phone to call Giuliani: security officials

Published

on

Russia likely learned of President Donald Trump’s Ukraine dealings months before they were exposed by a whistleblower report, because he used unsecured phone lines to speak with his personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, current and former officials told The Washington Post.

This article first appeared in Salon.

Phone records released in the House Intelligence Committee’s impeachment report this week showed that Giuliani made multiple calls to a blocked number listed as “-1.” Though Trump is not identified by name in the records, investigators believe the number belongs to Trump, and administration officials confirmed that Trump spoke with Giuliani on unsecured lines.

Continue Reading