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Conservative busts Trump for taking a page right out of the Russian playbook to disrupt Democrats in 2020

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The conservative site The Bulwark has a dire warning for the new way President Donald Trump will “meddle” in the 2020 election.

According to senior writer Andrew Egger, Trump’s latest attacks on former Vice President Joe Biden shows that he will likely play on the ignorance of voters who rarely pay attention to politics and policy.

Right now, Biden is doing exceedingly well among voters of color, but Trump’s tweet indicates he’s going to use a Russian tactic to try and divide the electorate.

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“Anyone associated with the 1994 Crime Bill will not have a chance of being elected. In particular, African Americans will not be able to vote for you. I, on the other hand, was responsible for Criminal Justice Reform, which had tremendous support, & helped fix the bad 1994 Bill!” Trump tweeted while in Japan over the holiday weekend.

U.S. intelligence agencies reported that the Russians linked to the interference specifically worked to “stoke unrest and even violence inside the U.S.” According to the NBC News report, as recently as the 2018 election, Russians were trying to manipulate African Americans to radicalize them.

“The documents — communications between associates of Yevgeny Prigozhin, a Kremlin-linked oligarch indicted by special counsel Robert Mueller for previous influence operations against the U.S. — laid out a new plot to manipulate and radicalize African Americans,” NBC said. “The plans show that Prigozhin’s circle has sought to exploit racial tensions well beyond Russia’s social media and misinformation efforts tied to the 2016 election.”

One document, in particular, admitted the key to Trump’s election was “deepened conflicts in American society.” The documents suggested if their efforts were successful, Russia could “undermine the country’s territorial integrity and military and economic potential.”

Trump’s tweet seems to parallel that Russian tactic. Egger nails Trump on the hypocrisy. While Biden has admitted many components of the crime bill were flawed, Trump has a wretched history of racist behavior, particularly when it comes to crime.

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“We already know the Democratic royal rumble is likely to prove brutal with 24 contenders and counting in the ring and the desperate desire to depose Trump as soon as possible stressing everybody out. Now throw Trump himself into that mix, and realize that he’s likely to treat this cycle like Russia treated the last one: trolling and rabble-rousing online, throwing daily Twitter bombs at candidates he thinks he can damage, and just generally multiplying the chaos by any means possible,” Eggers suggested.

Trump’s advocacy in the ’90s involved full-page ads in newspapers demanding that the “Central Park Five” be given the death penalty. The five young men accused of the crime were falsely convicted and ultimately released.

According to Tom Arnold, who appeared on “The Apprentice” with Trump, the president also has an unfortunate history of using the “N-word” to refer to Black people. While Arnold’s claims could be backed up with video proof, MGM has in its vaults; no one has released the tapes.

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Trump also got in trouble for equating Nazis and white supremacists with the people protesting them.

“Excuse me, excuse me. They didn’t put themselves — and you had some very bad people in that group, but you also had people that were very fine people, on both sides. You had people in that group. Excuse me, excuse me. I saw the same pictures as you did. You had people in that group that were there to protest the taking down of, to them, a very, very important statue and the renaming of a park from Robert E. Lee to another name,” Trump told reporters after a counter-protester was run over by a white supremacist.

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Still, Trump is already using the Russian playbook to distract Americans by talking about the crime bill. Perhaps that way, they won’t notice his long history of racism.


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