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Here are 15 of the wildest photos and videos of the tornadoes battering the central US

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Meteorologists began warning the central United States that a potentially serious weather event was forecasted for Monday. The storm didn’t disappoint for weather nerds fascinated by the power of Mother Nature.

Scientists warned that the storm would be so severe that schools still in session decided to have an inclimate weather day to ensure children were home and protected. On this day six years ago (May 20, 2013) a massive EF5 tornado moved through Moore, Oklahoma around the time children should have been let out from school. The storm cost billions of dollars in damages, more than 1,000 homes were destroyed or damaged and 24 people lost their lives. One of the most tragic was Plaza Towers Elementary that collapsed as the tornado passed over it. Seven children were killed inside.

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NOAA Satellites PA Officer John Leslie posted the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite operated by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It’s known as the GOES16. The graphic shows the severe weather literally blowing up like a marshmallow in a microwave.

A storm system that began southwest of El Reno, Oklahoma produced multiple vortices at the same time, shocking meteorologists and storm chasers on the ground in Oklahoma.

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Multiple-vortex tornado in Oklahoma Monday highlighted by KWTV’s David Payne (Photo: Screen capture)

Just seven miles southwest of Mangum, OK the second major tornadic storm formed at approximately 5:11 p.m. CDT. The first funnel dropped to the left side of the system and another tornado then quickly formed to the right side. Storm chaser Tom Pastrano reported that the funnel was violently spinning before it dropped down. The system, as a whole, was moving about 50 miles per hour.

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Chasers are great for covering the storm, but they’re often the first ones to spot a funnel on the ground. They can then warn local governments to alert citizens with tornado sirens, which save countless lives each season.

The storm Monday will continue well into the night dumping huge amounts of rain and subjecting three states to dangerous winds, lightning and tornadoes.

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You can see some of the other videos from the reporters, chasers and residents below:

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COVID-19

Plastic bubble brings joy to French nursing home

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Nathalie Szczepaniak caresses the hand of her husband Joseph, a care home resident, as the couple reunites after weeks without a visit because of France's coronavirus lockdown.

But this is no ordinary reunion.

The couple meets in an anti-virus "bubble" at Joseph's nursing home in Bourbourg, northern France, separated by a clear plastic sheet that allows them some physical contact, face-to-face, without the risk of infection.

Nathalie holds up the couple's dog, a white fluffy creature named Valco, so that Joseph, who has Parkinson's disease, can press his palm to its paw through the plastic.

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‘I’m entitled’: Kayleigh McEnany defends her 11 mail-in votes while calling it ‘fraud’ for the masses

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White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Thursday faced questions from Fox News about why she had voted by mail 11 times even though President Donald Trump has called absentee ballots a "scam."

McEnany was asked about her voting history after the Tampa Bay Times reported that she had used mail-in voting nearly a dozen times in recent years.

"So why is it OK for you to do it?" Fox News host Ed Henry asked McEnany. "I understand you are traveling, you're in a different city. But how can you really be assured that your votes were counted accurately but when other people do it, it's fraud."

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COVID-19

American Airlines to cut 30% of management staff

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American Airlines will cut 30 percent of its management and support staff in its latest belt-tightening move during the prolonged COVID-19 downturn, the company disclosed Thursday.

The big US carrier outlined a series of measures to reduce headcount throughout its operations in an email to staff that was released in a securities filing Thursday.

American currently has a team of 17,000 people in management and support, meaning the actions planned will cut about 5,100 jobs.

The move follows statements from United Airlines, Delta Air Lines and other carriers that have signaled deep job cuts due to sinking air travel demand from coronavirus shutdowns.

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