Quantcast
Connect with us

‘Only the Lord God Almighty is in control’: Texas lawmaker attacks noted pediatrician, calls vaccines ‘sorcery’

Published

on

An anti-vaccine Texas Republican state lawmaker attacked a distinguished medical doctor, the dean and chief of pediatric medicine at Baylor College of Medicine National School of Tropical Medicine, over vaccines this week.

State Rep. Jonathan Stickland (photo) made a wide variety of remarks on Twitter, at one point telling Dr. Peter Hotez, the noted global health and vaccinology expert, to “mind your own business” as he exploded into his anti-vaxx rant, which The Houston Chroniclereported.

ADVERTISEMENT

Stickland, who describes himself on Facebook as a “Conservative Christian Republican,” also insisted that vaccines are “sorcery,” and “only The Lord God Almighty is in control.”

Dr. Hotez had posted a graphic to Twitter, warning of the explosive growth of vaccine exemptions, and expressing concern that children in Texas “have been placed in harm’s way for the financial gain of special & outside interest groups.”

Rep. Stickland lashed out, attacking Dr. Hotez as “bought and paid for by the biggest special interest in politics,” and claiming that parental rights are more important than “science,” which he put in scare-quotes.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I don’t take a dime from the vaccine industry,” Dr. Hotez responded. “I develop neglected disease vaccines for the world’s poorest people. And as a Texas pediatrician-scientist it is most certainly my business.”

Stickland called vaccines “sorcery,” and developing neglected disease vaccines for the world’s poorest people a “disgusting” business model.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rep. Stickland, who has a disturbing history of comments about marital rape and holds anti-LGBT positions, then attacked the Twitter account of a woman-owned microbiology business that reminded him that science “saved your ungrateful life more than once.”

ADVERTISEMENT

He called on them to “repent” and claimed saving lives is “something only The Lord God Almighty is in control of.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Stickland also attacked an expert cancer surgeon and professor who challenged him, calling the physician a “communist.”

On his campaign website, Rep. Stickland makes clear he is opposed to same-sex marriage: “I believe marriage is between a man, a woman, and God,” he says. He also brags about authoring a bill “that would have forbidden state or local governments from using public funds to issue same-sex marriage licenses.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Rep. Stickland’s remarks before he was first elected to the Texas State House have also caused outrage.

A Texas Tribune article reports that in 2008, “on a fantasy sports message board, Stickland responded to a user’s request for sex advice by saying, ‘Rape is non existent in marriage, take what you want my friend!'”

Stickland later apologized, only after The Texas Observer first published his remarks which the paper called “rape encouragement.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Federal judge overturns ObamaCare’s transgender protections, because Jesus

Published

on

A U.S. District Court judge in Texas has overturned the protections written into ObamaCare for transgender people, ruling they violate the religious rights of healthcare providers who hold religious beliefs that oppose the existence of transgender people.

On Tuesday Judge Reed O'Connor, appointed by President George W. Bush, "vacated an Obama-era regulation that prohibited providers and insurers who receive federal money from denying treatment or coverage to anyone based on sex, gender identity or termination of pregnancy," The Hill reports.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Sanctuaries protecting gun rights and the unborn challenge the legitimacy and role of federal law

Published

on

In June 2019, the small Texas town of Waskom declared itself a “Sanctuary City for the Unborn.”

Waskom’s city council passed an ordinance that labels groups – like Planned Parenthood, NARAL and others – that perform abortions or assist women in obtaining them “criminal organizations.”

The ordinance borrows from a similar resolution passed in March by Roswell, New Mexico. Unlike the merely rhetorical Roswell resolution, however, the Texas law bans most abortions within city limits. There are no abortion providers in the town, so it is not clear how the town would enforce the ordinance. It might, perhaps, deter an organization from opening a clinic.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Quantum dots that light up TVs could be used for brain research

Published

on

While many people love colorful photos of landscapes, flowers or rainbows, some biomedical researchers treasure vivid images on a much smaller scale – as tiny as one-thousandth the width of a human hair.

To study the micro world and help advance medical knowledge and treatments, these scientists use fluorescent nano-sized particles.

Quantum dots are one type of nanoparticle, more commonly known for their use in TV screens. They’re super tiny crystals that can transport electrons. When UV light hits these semiconducting particles, they can emit light of various colors.

That fluorescence allows scientists to use them to study hidden or otherwise cryptic parts of cells, organs and other structures.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image