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Presidential historian drops bomb on Trump over how history will treat him if he goes down to defeat in 2020

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On Saturday, historian Michael Beschloss told MSNBC’s Joy Reid that if President Donald Trump were to be defeated for a second term in 2020, it would likely be viewed by history as functionally equivalent to if he had been impeached and removed from office. Nevertheless, he added, that does not mean there wouldn’t be differences in those scenarios, or that there wouldn’t be downsides to avoiding impeachment.

“So for Trump, the question that Democrats are asking is that losing an election, is the equivalent sanction, historically,” said Reid. “There have been only a few. It’s very hard to stop a president from being re-elected, there are not that many who try to be re-elected that are not. Is becoming a one-term president, from a historian’s point of view, equal to impeachment?”

“Well in a way, it is, if people have said that you were defeated because of the reasons that you were impeached for,” said Beschloss. “So that’s one thing to think about.”

“I think the larger thing to think about … one of the things that’s come through this as a pattern is that one thing impeachment does is there is a president who is going out of control,” Beschloss added. “Impeachment is a statement by Congress that this cannot continue.”

“And I think in the same sense, if Donald Trump tries to expand power and Congress doesn’t say this is something we have to blow the whistle on, we’ve got to restore the balance of power between the Congress and the presidency, then we’re really in danger of losing our democracy, and future presidents will say, ‘Donald Trump got away with everything and he didn’t even get impeached, so will I,'” said Beschloss.

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Here are 5 questions Robert Mueller must answer during his Congressional hearings

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Former special counsel Robert Mueller will be testifying publicly before Congress on July 17th, the chairs of the House Judiciary and House Intelligence committees announced on Tuesday.

The special counsel had fought against testifying but was subpoenaed to compel his attendance.

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‘Finally #MuellerTime’: Internet celebrates Mueller’s upcoming public testimony on Russia investigation

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On Tuesday, the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees announced that special counsel Robert Mueller will publicly testify about the Russia investigation's findings before Congress.

Quickly, the internet reacted to the news:

This will really matter, even if Mueller merely repeats what he said in his report. The vast majority of Americans have never read it. https://t.co/ZuRHqbRAEv

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Robert Mueller subpoena isn’t a ‘friendly one’: Intelligence Committee Chair tells Maddow

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Intelligence Committee chair Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) joined with Judiciary Chair Jerry Nadler (D-NY) in subpoenaing former special counsel Robert Mueller. But according to Schiff, this wasn't exactly an agreement the committees came to with Mueller or the special counsel's investigators.

"We consistently communicated our committees' intentions to issue these subpoenas if necessary and we now understand it is necessary to do so. Should we see this as a friendly subpoena that Robert Mueller believed had to be issued before he could accept an invitation to testify?" asked MSNBC host Rachel Maddow.

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Trump endorses killing journalists, like Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Online ad networks are now targeting sites that cover acts of violence against dissidents, LGBTQ people and people of color.

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