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Swedish prosecutor issues formal request to hold Assange on rape suspicion

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Swedish prosecutors on Monday issued a formal request to hold WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, currently imprisoned in Britain, on suspicion of rape — a first step towards seeking his extradition to Sweden.

Swedish deputy director of public prosecutions Eva-Marie Persson said in a statement she had filed a request with the Uppsala district court to have Assange detained in his absence over an alleged rape.

Detaining someone in their absence is a standard part of Swedish legal procedure if a suspect is outside the country or cannot be located.

The request follows last week’s reopening of a 2010 rape investigation, and Persson added that once the court had granted the request, she would then ask British authorities to transfer Assange to Sweden.

“If the court decides to detain him, I will issue a European Arrest Warrant concerning surrender to Sweden,” Persson said.

The Australian whistleblower, who holed himself up in the Ecuadoran embassy in London for seven years to avoid a British extradition order to Sweden, was arrested by British police on April 11 after Ecuador gave him up.

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A London court sentenced him on May 1 to 50 weeks in jail for breaching the British order.

The Swedish investigation concerns events which took place in 2010 when a Swedish woman accused Assange of rape, after meeting him at a WikiLeaks conference in Stockholm.

Assange has always denied the allegations.

Swedish authorities closed the investigation in 2017, when Sweden’s then director of public prosecutions Marianne Ny argued that since Assange
could not be reached, having taken up residence in Ecuador’s embassy, it was not possible to proceed with the probe.

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But the investigation was reopened on May 13 following Assange’s arrest in London.

– Uncertain future –

The prosecution authority was unable to say when the detention hearing would take place since this would be up to the court to decide, and that a European Arrest Warrant would only be issued after the court had granted the detention request.

When contacted by AFP, the Uppsala district court, where the request was filed, said the detention hearing had not yet been scheduled.

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Assange’s Swedish lawyer Per E Samuelson said that he didn’t think the detention hearing could take place this week, since he would need to go over the matter with his client first.

“I’ve written the district court and said that they can’t hold a detention hearing until I’ve met my client and received instructions. Since he is currently incarcerated in London I haven’t even been able to establish contact over the phone yet,” Samuelson told AFP on Monday.

Assange is already the subject of an extradition request from the United States, where he is wanted for hacking. That request was only revealed following his arrest in London.

Eva-Marie Persson said it would be up to British authorities to decide which country’s request should take precedence.

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“In the event of a conflict between a European Arrest Warrant and a request for extradition from the US, UK authorities will decide on the order of priority. The outcome of this process is impossible to predict,” Persson said.

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Russian-American businessman at heart of Trump Tower Moscow project will testify to Congress on Friday

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On Wednesday, the Washington Post reported that Felix Sater, the Russian-American real-estate developer at the center of the proposal to build a Trump Tower project in Moscow in 2016, will testify before the House Intelligence Committee in a closed-door hearing on Friday.

Sater, in addition to working on the planning for Trump Tower Moscow, escorted Ivanka and Donald Trump Jr. to Russia during the preliminary stages of the project, which never came to fruition.

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CNN analyst demolishes White House’s latest attempt to stonewall Congress: ‘There is no provision for this immunity’

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Ahead of former White House Communications Director Hope Hicks being called to Congress to testify about former special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation — during which she was, by all accounts, less than helpful — the Trump administration took the unprecedented step of advising Congress that Hicks was given "immunity" from talking to them by the president.

On CNN's "The Situation Room," national security analyst Shawn Turner demolished this legal strategy.

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John Bolton just got put in his place: report

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National Security Adviser John Bolton has wanted a war with Iran since long before many Americans were even born. But according to The Daily Beast, he might be losing the internal battle to go to war.

After the Pentagon announced that they had "evidence" that Iran attacked an oil tanker in the Gulf of Oman, political analysts began to speculate it would be used as a justification for war with Iran. But apparently, Trump realized the Middle East saber-rattling doesn't play well in Middle America.

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