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Texas House OKs bill to ban death penalty for those with severe mental illness

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For the second time in two weeks, the Texas House moved to change death penalty law.

On Wednesday, the chamber tentatively passed a measure that would prohibit handing down a death sentence to someone with a severe mental illness, like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. House Bill 1936 by state Rep. Toni Rose, D-Dallas, would let capital murder defendants present evidence at trial that they were severely mentally ill at the time of the crime. If the jury agrees, the defendant would be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole if found guilty.

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The measure passed on a quick voice vote with no discussion after being delayed several times in the last week. The bill will come up again this week for a final, recorded vote. If passed, it would then go to the Senate.

But Rose doesn’t expect her colleagues in the lower chamber to approve it on that necessary final vote later this week, the Austin American-Statesman reportedWednesday night. She told the paper she expects it to face opposition from Republican proponents of the death penalty.

Rose’s bill would allow defendants with mental illness to be ineligible for the death penalty if they had schizophrenia, a schizoaffective disorder, or a bipolar disorder, and, at the time of the crime, had active psychotic symptoms that impaired the defendant’s rationality or understanding of the consequences of their actions. Rose brought a similar bill to the Legislature in 2017, but it never made it to the House floor for debate.

Last Monday, the House moved to create a pretrial process for determining if a capital murder defendant had an intellectual disability and, therefore, would be constitutionally ineligible for execution. Another bill was passed last month to clarify juror instructions in death penalty cases. Neither of those bills have made it out of Senate committees yet.

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There is currently no law that restricts issuing a death sentence for mentally ill defendants, but the U.S. Supreme Court has held that inmates must be able to understand that they are about to be put to death — and why — to actually carry out executions.

The most well-known inmate with mental illness is Scott Panetti, a diagnosed schizophrenic who killed his wife’s parents in 1992 and has lived on Texas’ death row for nearly a quarter century. At his trial, Panetti — who represented himself — dressed as a cowboy and tried to call witnesses such as the Pope, John F. Kennedy and Jesus Christ.

 

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Corey Lewandowski, Stephen Miller and the wages of contempt in TrumpWorld

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One of the worst side effects of the Trump presidency is the unleashing upon the world of these squinty-eyed, shaved-head, pissy little monsters like Corey Lewandowski and Stephen Miller, providing them a platform where they can spread their hatred of and contempt for decency and democracy and all things right and just well beyond their lonely basements and bedrooms where they had heretofore been confined. Guys like them have always been with us. You can probably recall running across one or two of them in a civics class in high school or college, shooting their sweaty palms into the air from the back row, trying to be recognized so they could challenge one liberal shibboleth or another.

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Five things to watch for on Emmys night

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Television's glitzy big night out is upon us -- the 71st Emmy Awards kick off Sunday evening in Los Angeles.

A little show called "Game of Thrones" looks set to dominate the proceedings one last time. But there is more to television's Oscars than the blood-spattered fight for the Iron Throne.

Here are five things to look out for:

- No host, many stars -

The Oscars went without a host in January -- and the streamlined ceremony got a 12 percent bump in total number of viewers. So few in Hollywood were surprised when the Emmys followed suit.

The lack of a host means the focus will turn to the starry lineup of A-list presenters, including Gwyneth Paltrow, Ben Stiller, Michael Douglas, Naomi Watts, Julia Louis-Dreyfus... and the Kardashian clan.

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US and El Salvador sign agreement on asylum to curb migration

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The United States and El Salvador reached an agreement Friday aimed at curbing illegal migration, opening the door for the US to potentially send refugees back to the violent Central American country.

The deal was announced at a joint press conference in Washington by Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan and Salvadoran Foreign Minister Alexandra Hill.

The agreement -- which will only go into effect after both countries have implemented new border security and asylum processes -- is the latest step by Donald Trump's administration to curb immigration to the US by leaning on neighbors to take in migrants.

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