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Theresa May postpones her final Brexit showdown

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The British government on Thursday postponed Theresa May’s final Brexit showdown in parliament following an outcry over concessions that looked set to speed up the end of her tumultuous spell as premier.

The increasingly isolated Conservative premier is facing the prospect of being forced to resign without have achieved her mission to guide her fractured country out of the European Union after nearly 50 years of membership.

She had insisted Wednesday that she would try to ram her version of Brexit through parliament on the fourth — and what would be her last — attempt in the week starting June 3.

But the vote was not included on that week’s parliamentary schedule published Thursday.

Government whip Mark Spencer told lawmakers that May’s office “will update the House on the publication and introduction of the Withdrawal Agreement Bill on our return from the Whitsun recess” on June 4.

May had earlier tried to win over politically ambitious holdouts within her own party by promising them she would step down after next month’s vote.

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But her end is being brought forward by her decision to hold out the prospect of a new Brexit referendum to the pro-EU opposition.

The move failed to win over any converts and sparked a mutiny within the top echelons of her government and party ranks.

Senior Conservatives from the so-called 1922 Committee met privately Wednesday to discuss making rule changes that could topple May in the coming days.

She will meet the group’s leader Friday for talks at which seemingly everyone expects May to disclose when she will step down.

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What happens to Brexit in the meantime is unclear.

The lengthy and rancorous standoff has delayed Britain’s departure from March 29 until October 31 — a date that might be extended still further.

– ‘Make the right decision’ –

May’s woes were underscored when Andrea Leadsom — one of cabinet’s strongest Brexit backers — quit her post as the government’s representative in parliament over its handling of the crisis.

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“No one has wanted you to succeed more than I have, but I do now urge you to make the right decisions in the interests of the country, this government and our party,” Leadsom told May in her resignation letter.

May thanked Leadsom for her “passion, drive and sincerity”.

Yet she also took issue with Leadsom’s assessment of her Brexit strategy — a stance that some UK media interpreted as sign that she still intended to fight for her job.

“I do not agree with you that the deal which we have negotiated with the European Union means that the United Kingdom will not become a sovereign country,” May wrote in reply.

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Leadsom was not the most senior cabinet member of the nearly three dozen who have resigned under May’s watch.

But she held on to a powerful post that set the parliamentary agenda and decided which bills come up for a vote.

Her position was filled Thursday by Mel Stride, who moves over from his current role as paymaster general in the UK treasury.

Leadsom is just one of more than a dozen declared or presumed contenders for May’s job.

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– May’s legacy –

Many of Thursday’s newspaper front pages pictured May leaving Downing Street late Wednesday with what they interpreted as tears in her eyes.

Yet the day itself was uncharacteristically bereft of consequential news due to reporting restrictions linked to Thursday’s European Parliament elections.

Britain is taking part against its will because of its inability to figure out how it intends to function without the rest of Europe.

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The European vote is being interpreted as a referendum on Brexit and May’s party is projected to finish with as little as 10 percent.

Some analysts said splits across the UK political spectrum witnessed in the three years since Britons picked independence over Europe would have made the job of any prime minister difficult.

“It’s hard to think of a (Conservative) politician who would have been the perfect PM in such circumstances,” said Queen Mary University professor Tim Bale.

“But it’s just as hard to think of anyone who would have been much worse than her.”

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‘Everyone knows what to expect’ at Trump’s Amway Center re-election kickoff

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Donald Trump considers himself a legendary salesman, but can he really sell America on giving him four more drama-filled years at the White House?

Tuesday, he'll make his big pitch.

The 2020 reelection kickoff rally is being held in Orlando, Florida and campaign operations chief Michael Glassner says the "historic" event "has already generated tens of thousands of ticketing requests."

There's little mystery about how the night will go down.

Expect Trump, the self-promoting hero of his ghost-written book "The Art of the Deal," to claim the US economy is richer, the military stronger, and the country more respected than ever in history.

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Florida man’s own family blasts him after he was arrested for racist threats: ‘This isn’t how we were raised’

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After a Florida man was arrested for trying to start a race war, a member of his own family slammed his values.

"A Florida man’s social media posts that threatened violence against African-Americans, Jews and homosexuals and that urged his followers to start a race war netted him a $1 million bond," the Miami Herald reported Saturday. "And then there’s another $100,000 bond he would have to pay to get out of Lee County Jail because of a weapons charge."

Joshua Leff, 40, is being held in the Lee County Jail.

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Trump accuses newspaper of ‘virtual act of treason’ for reporting on a story that made him look awful

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President Donald Trump attacked an American newspaper for reporting a story that made him look bad.

"Do you believe that the Failing New York Times just did a story stating that the United States is substantially increasing Cyber Attacks on Russia. (sic) This is a virtual act of Treason by a once great paper so desperate for a story, any story, even if bad for our Country ... also, not true," the commander-in-chief tweeted on Saturday evening.

"Anything goes with our corrupt news media today," Trump argued.

"They will do, or say, whatever it takes, with not even the slightest thought of consequence," he continued.

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