Quantcast
Connect with us

This right-wing senator just said the US could quickly ‘win’ a war against Iran with ‘two strikes’

Published

on

Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR). Image via screengrab.

In a new interview with Firing Line’s Margaret Hoover, GOP Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas expressed naive confidence about the prospect of war with Iran — a prospect that President Donald Trump’s top advisers seem intent on driving the country toward.

“Could we win a war with Iran?” asked Hoover.

“Yes,” said Cotton.

“That didn’t take you a second,” she said.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Two strikes: the first strike and a last strike,” Cotton said.

Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, on the other hand, had a much more realistic idea of what’s at stake in a possible war on Twitter: “Trump thinks our troops are toy soldiers he can just move around—but these are real men and women whose lives are at stake. Many are in my state. I’ve got a kid in the military. And I will do anything I can to stop this President from getting us into a war we should not be in.”

He similarly compared the rush to war with the George W. Bush administration’s disastrous bumbling into Iraq. And that’s much closer to how Americans should think about the prospect of an Iran war — a duplication of the Iraq war. That didn’t end when the U.S. took out Saddam Hussein, because it threw the country into turmoil. We were responsible for that chaos, and American leaders felt we would be at risk if they allowed the disaster to worsen. So we stayed, and American soldiers are still in Iraq 16 years later. In the meantime, hundreds of thousands — if not more — were killed as a result of the conflict.

That’s what Americans should expect if Trump brings us to war with Iran. And to be fair to Cotton, the interview suggests he’s not hoping for that outcome. He didn’t outright call for regime change, though he called on the regime to change its actions.

“War is never inevitable,” Cotton said. “War is always the product of human choices.”

ADVERTISEMENT

It’s a good point, but one of those choices is underestimating the cost and the difficulty of war — and having a poorly defined sense of what “winning” would mean at all. And on that front, Cotton’s reckless assertion that a war could be won with “two strikes” only increases the likelihood of a conflict.

Watch the clip below:

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Doctors urge CDC to admit side effects from COVID vaccine won’t be ‘a walk in the park’

Published

on

Doctors are urging the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to be upfront with the American public about side effects from a potential COVID-19 vaccine.

According to CNBC, the doctors are worried that people will refuse a second dose of the vaccine after experiencing the side effects. Vaccines being produced by both Pfizer and Moderna require two doses.

“We really need to make patients aware that this is not going to be a walk in the park,” Dr. Sandra Fryhofer of the American Medical Association told CNBC. “They are going to know they had a vaccine. They are probably not going to feel wonderful. But they’ve got to come back for that second dose.”

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump supporter accused of voter fraud invited to apply for a pardon — in gratitude for proving ‘how hard voter fraud is’

Published

on

On Wednesday, writing on Twitter, Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman invited a Trump supporter accused of voter fraud to apply for a pardon if convicted — in thanks for showing Pennsylvania voters, and Republicans around the country, how difficult it is to commit voter fraud.

The case centers on a man in Forty Fort, Luzerne County, who allegedly filled out an absentee ballot application for his deceased mother with the intention of casting a second ballot for President Donald Trump, in her name. He faces up to 10 years in prison if found guilty.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Georgia GOP secretary of state: Trump ‘threw my family under the bus’ even though we voted for him

Published

on

Brad Raffensperger, the Republican secretary of state in Georgia, has written an angry editorial for USA Today in which he details the harassment he and his family have been subjected to because he followed the law and certified President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

Raffensperger starts out his editorial by praising the Peach State for holding a free and fair election under difficult circumstances stemming from the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Continue Reading