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Trump pardons Charlottesville truther and convicted white-collar criminal who wrote glowing book about him

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On Wednesday, President Donald Trump pardoned Conrad Black, a Canadian-born newspaper publisher and member of the British House of Lords who was convicted amid allegations he stole $60 million from investors and sentenced to 42 months in prison.

Black published a book last May entitled Donald J. Trump: A President Like No Other, full of glowing praise for his “friend” Trump. The president, in turn, praised Black as an “entrepreneur and scholar” and stated that the Supreme Court “overturned almost all charges in his case.”

Additionally, Black is noted for coming heavily to Trump’s defense in the aftermath of the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, where the president was broadly panned for insisting that there were some “very fine people” in with the neo-Nazis. In a heavily revisionist blog post in 2017, Black insisted Trump was correct, insinuating that most the neo-Nazis were really just there to peacefully celebrate Southern heritage and violent left-wing agitators from Antifa and Black Lives Matter instigated the violence. Robert E. Lee, he wrote, “would have been as disgusted as we are by the extremists of both sides.”

Black is the latest in a series of deeply political pardons issued by the president, who has come to relish his use of the one presidential power that neither Congress nor the courts has any authority to review.

He has also pardoned former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, a notorious racist who housed prisoners in self-described “concentration camps” and was convicted of contempt of court for profiling Hispanics; far-right author and documentary filmmaker Dinesh D’Souza, who pled guilty to a fraudulent campaign finance scheme; and Army Lt. Col. Michael Behenna, who was sentenced to 25 years in prison for murdering a detainee.

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Hundreds of thousands protest in Puerto Rico, calling for governor to resign

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Hundreds of thousands of people marched in San Juan on Monday to demand Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rosselló resign over offensive chat messages, the latest scandal to hit a bankrupt island struggling to recover from 2017 hurricanes.

Rosselló's announcement on Sunday that he would not seek re-election next year and would step down as head of the New Progressive Party failed to appease the crowds, who called for him to immediately surrender the governorship.

The island’s largest newspaper called on the first-term governor to leave office and reported over 500,000 protesters took to the streets in San Juan.

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Harrowing new report: Malicious browser extensions are stealing your personal information

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Web browsers have become the equivalent of safe deposit boxes, digital spaces where we stuff our personal information and expect it to be kept safe. While the websites that harbor sensitive data generally swear that this information is private and protected, a detailed report by cybersecurity researcher Sam Jadali, explained in depth by Dan Goodin at Ars Technica, found that eight browser extensions for Google Chrome and Firefox were harvesting personal data from millions of people, unbeknownst to both them and to the makers of those browsers.

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What drove the New Yorker’s Jane Mayer into Al Franken denialism?

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The defenders of Sen. Al Franken are perhaps the single most embarrassing group of allegedly progressive people in the Democratic coalition. Franken, who resigned from the Senate in January 2018, was accused by eight different women of sexual impropriety. Most of these accusations were both serious and credible, in that the women making them were mostly liberals who had no apparent reason to lie about Franken's behavior toward them. Despite this, Franken's defenders are married to the delusional belief that it's all just a frame-up and that if he'd had "due process" in the form of a Senate ethics investigation (run by Republicans, who control that chamber) he would have somehow managed to prove this.

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