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Trump plans to delay auto tariffs for six months: industry sources

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President Donald Trump plans to hold off on imposing steep tariffs on imported autos while the US pursues agreements with key trading partners, industry sources told AFP Wednesday.

Trump has threatened to impose 25 percent punitive duties on autos — a possibility that has worried the European Union and Japan in particular, as well as Mexico and Canada.

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Facing a deadline to announce a decision by Saturday on whether to implement the tariffs based on national security concerns, the sources said Trump would hold off as negotiations proceed.

New tariffs risk exploding already tense trade relations with Washington’s major trading partners, who are angry about punitive duties on steel and aluminum imposed last year.

CNBC and other media earlier Wednesday cited government sources also saying that Trump was expected to try negotiations before imposing any new import taxes.

German carmakers are especially concerned about the tariff threat, but Trump and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker declared a truce in July 2018 in order to pursue negotiations.

EU officials have repeatedly said they expect the US to abide by the agreement to hold off on any new tariffs.

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Under US law, Trump must make a decision 90 days after receiving the report from the Commerce Department on the national security threat faced by the American auto sector — or Saturday.

If he decides to impose tariffs, they must take effect 15 days after the announcement.

However, he can delay implementation for 180 days if he decides to negotiate.

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The White House currently is negotiating trade deals with the EU and Japan, and late last year completed a revised accord with North American trading partners Mexico and Canada.


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‘Where’s Melania?’ The View hosts blister first lady for ignoring ‘bully-in-chief’ Trump’s attack on Greta Thunberg

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A discussion on Donald Trump's bitter Twitter attack on 16-year-old environmentalist Greta Thunberg, after she aced him out of Time Magazine's Person of the Year, caught the attention of the panelists on The View, who hammered both the president and the first lady after they both protested the mention of their teen son Barron just weeks ago.

After co-host Joy Behar read the president's tweet from Thursday morning where he proclaimed, "So ridiculous. Greta must work on her Anger Management problem, then go to a good old fashioned movie with a friend! Chill Greta, Chill!" she called the president out for being jealous of the teen for getting the Time magazine cover he so desperately wanted.

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Matt Gaetz probably isn’t the best to go after someone’s drug use: Internet cautions Republican Congressman

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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) probably isn't the best person to make an argument against driving under the influence given his own arrests. Even Rep Hank Johnson (D-GA) cautioned against "the pot calling the kettle black," during the Thursday House Judiciary Committee hearing.

Gaetz was arrested for a DUI in 2008 on suspicion of a DUI after he refused a field sobriety test and a breathalyzer test. Just two years later he was elected to the Florida state legislature and by 2016 he was in Congress.

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Rhode Island Dem perfectly explains why Trump should be impeached — and not face re-election

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Rep. David Cicilline (D-RI) explained why President Donald Trump should be impeached and removed, instead of voted out of office next year.

Republicans have complained that impeachment would overturn the last election, but the Rhode Island Democrat laid out the case for removing Trump before he faced re-election.

"Impeachment is an especially essential remedy for conduct that corrupts elections," Cicilline said, quoting from an open letter signed by more than 800 legal scholars.

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