Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump promised to return to the moon by 2024 — the man hired to make it happen just up and quit

Published

on

Once again, a Trump project has failed because he did not lay the proper groundwork, made no attempt to get support from Congress, and because he is not, in fact, a great dealmaker.

Since 2017 President Donald Trump has said he wanted to return Americans to the moon. He promised he would make an American astronaut the first woman to walk on the moon. He promised to do it by 2024 – four years ahead of NASA’s planned schedule. And he sent Vice President Mike Pence out repeatedly to deliver his message.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Some will say it’s too hard, it’s too risky, it’s too expensive, but the same was said back in 1962,” Pence, trying to echo President John F. Kennedy, said in March. “Now as then, the United States has a president who is a dreamer, who understands that this is a challenge that once again we are unwilling to postpone and one we intend to win again.”

NASA appropriately christened the project Artemis, named for the Greek goddess of the moon – who is Apollo’s twin sister.

Early last week Trump even tweeted about it:

On April 9 NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine brought in Mark Sirangelo to make it all happen. Thursday, Sirangelo up and quit – six weeks after he was hired.

ADVERTISEMENT

Reuters chalked it up to “the culmination of internal strife and dwindling congressional support for the lunar initiative.”

Once again, a Trump project – this time a rare worthwhile one – has failed because he did not lay the proper groundwork, made no attempt to get support from Congress, and because he is not, in fact, a great dealmaker.

Sirangelo’s “departure came after lawmakers rejected NASA’s proposal to create a separate directorate within the space agency to oversee future lunar missions and ultimately develop human exploration of Mars,” Reuters’ reporter Joey Roulette notes.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The proposal was not accepted at this time, so we will move forward under our current organizational structure,” Bridenstine said in a statement. “Given NASA is no longer pursuing the new mission directorate, Mark has opted to pursue other opportunities.”

But hours earlier Bridenstine was delivering a speech to students at Florida Tech.

“This is the Artemis generation,” he told them, as Roulette tweeted:

ADVERTISEMENT

One day after Trump’s tweet, NASA pinned this tweet to the top of its Twitter page, where it currently remains:

 

 

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Internet slams ex-Trump aide for bragging he’ll be loyal to the president when he testifies before Congress

Published

on

On Tuesday, ahead of his public testimony before the House Judiciary Committee, President Donald Trump's former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski took to Twitter to effectively boast that he will parrot the president's talking points and offer nothing new to House Democrats — and tease an upcoming run for Senate in 2020:

Excited about the opportunity to remind the American people today there was no collusion no obstruction. There were lots of angry Democrats who tried to take down a duly elected President. Tune in. #Senate2020.

Continue Reading

Commentary

Trump is a wannabe dictator in training

Published

on

In a view shared by many, it is easy to believe that what Donald Trump really wants is not to be president of the country, but dictator of it.

Indeed, he has suggested how good it might be for him to enjoy a third term, perhaps more, even though the Constitution forcefully forbids it.

In a Father's Day tweet he fantasized over the possibility, suggesting the public might “demand” that he serve a third term. The [good news], he wrote, “is that at the end of six years, after America has been made GREAT again and I leave the beautiful White House  (do you think the people would demand that I stay longer? KEEP AMERICA GREAT)….”

Continue Reading
 

Commentary

Two entrepreneurs explain why the health insurance industry is a direct threat to middle-class life

Published

on

Among many recent troubling headlines was this one: “Families Go Deep in Debt to Stay in the Middle Class.” That story came on the heels of a report that consumer debt in the United States hit $14 trillion in the first quarter of the year, a level not seen since just before the financial crash of 2008.

To understand how we got here, it’s important to note another finding we feel has been perhaps most damaging to America’s middle class: since 1990, health care costs have risen 276 percent as wages, when adjusting for inflation, have barely grown at all.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image