Quantcast
Connect with us

Victims of Chile Nazi sect says German compensation not enough

Published

on

Victims of a Chile-based Nazi pedophile sect said compensation offered by Germany was not enough to make up for decades of slavery and abuse.

Germany said Friday it would pay up to 10,000 euros ($11,000) each to victims of the “Colonia Dignidad” commune founded by a former Nazi soldier.

“It’s a help, yes, but it does not solve the problem. We are a lost generation,” Horst Schaffrick, a German who arrived at the enclave with his family at the age of three, told AFP.

ADVERTISEMENT

Schaffrick suffered sexual abuse by former Wehrmacht soldier Paul Schaefer, who founded the sect in southern Chile in 1961.

The commune was presented as an idyllic German family village but in reality, Schaefer, a convicted pedophile, abused, drugged and indoctrinated the few hundred residents and kept them as virtual slaves.

His group had close ties to the 1973-1990 dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet and would torture and “disappear” regime critics.

AFP / Pablo COZZAGLIO Winfried Hempel lived with the Nazi sect until the age of 20 and is now fighting for proper compensation for the victims

Germany said Friday it would pay up to 10,000 euros to victims of the sect.

The compensation “covers very little, if you compare it to the 40 years of work without pay,” said Schaffrick, who also referred to “the suffering caused by slavery, beatings, drugs and sexual abuse for 20 years.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“How am I going to continue in my old age, how am I going to live? It cannot be solved, that’s what is serious about this situation,” he said.

– Violence and abuse –

Winfried Hempel, who was born in the commune and lived there until the age of 20, also felt the proposed compensation “is a step forward, but certainly not enough.”

“What we would have wanted, and what we are arguing for, would be that we give settlers who are old enough to retire a decent pension, no more and no less,” said the lawyer, who is fighting for the victims.

ADVERTISEMENT

At his office in Santiago, Hempel told AFP they would continue to seek proper compensation.

Some 240 German and Chilean survivors are eligible for the payments, including about 80 who now live in Germany, from a fund valued at an initial 3.5 million euros until 2024.

ADVERTISEMENT

The European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights said Germany’s foreign ministry was “dodging its legal responsibility to compensate the victims” more fully, adding that “many Chilean victims were left out”.

AFP/File / Rolando ANDRADE Sect leader Paul Schaefer (C) was arrested in 2005 in Argentina and jailed in Chile. He died behind bars in 2010

A German government and parliamentary committee in its report said Friday that Schaefer “tore families apart, abused countless children and actively collaborated with Pinochet dictatorship henchmen on torture, murder and disappearances.

“The survivors still suffer massively from the severe psychological and physical consequences after years of harm caused by violence, abuse, exploitation and slave labour.”

ADVERTISEMENT

However, it also said that the German government “is of the opinion that no legal claims against the Federal Republic of Germany have arisen” from the abuses in Colonia Dignidad.

The support measures for victims would be paid “exclusively out of moral responsibility and without recognition of a legal obligation”, it said.

The scale of the atrocities committed at the fenced-in mountain commune 350 kilometres (215 miles) south of Santiago came to light only after the end of Pinochet’s regime.

Schaefer, having initially run from justice, was arrested in Argentina in 2005 and then jailed in Chile for child sexual and other abuses. He died behind bars in 2010 at the age of 88.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Judge blocking release of Jeffrey Epstein records has ties to officials linked to Epstein: report

Published

on

On Saturday, the Miami Herald reported that a judge who blocked the release of grand jury material in the Jeffrey Epstein child sex abuse case has ties to three officials with a vested interest in the outcome of the lawsuits surrounding the scandal.

"Krista Marx, the Palm Beach chief judge who also heads a panel that polices judicial conduct, has potential conflicts of interest involving three prominent players embroiled in the Epstein sex-trafficking saga: State Attorney Dave Aronberg, who has been sued by the Palm Beach Post to release the grand jury records; Sheriff Ric Bradshaw, whose department’s favored treatment of Epstein while he was in the Palm Beach County jail is part of an ongoing state criminal investigation; and ex-State Attorney Barry Krischer, part of the same investigation in connection with his decision not to prosecute Epstein on child-sex charges," wrote Julie Brown, a reporter who has extensively covered the Epstein case.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

WATCH: Buffalo cops and firefighters cheer officers charged with assault as they leave the courthouse

Published

on

According to a report from both CNN and MSNBC, the two Buffalo police officers who were charged with second-degree assault after shoving a 75-year-old anti-police brutality protester to the ground where he sustained head injuries were greeted with applause after they were arraigned on Saturday morning.

MSNBC's Alex Witt noted that both officers were released without having to post bail.

According to ABC News, "Officers Aaron Torglaski and Robert McCabe were charged with second-degree assault during their video arraignments on Saturday and were released on their own recognizance. They both entered no guilty pleas and are expected back in court on July 20."

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Lindsey Graham leveled by Jim Clyburn for ‘out of touch’ comments on police brutalizing African-Americans

Published

on

In response to protests over the police killing of George Floyd, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) had this to say: "I've come to believe that young black men rightly or wrongly perceive the police to be a threat when many times they're not, and we've got to deal with that problem."

On Saturday's edition of MSNBC's "AM Joy," Graham's fellow South Carolina lawmaker, Democratic Rep. Jim Clyburn, laid into Graham for his comments. "He is from Seneca, South Carolina," said Clyburn. "I know the history of Seneca, South Carolina. Where has he been?"

"You know, I've been really interested, we had some foolishness the other day," said Clyburn. "Drew Brees has gotten himself in some difficulty with his teammates, how his grandfather and father thought about anybody kneeling would be disrespecting the flag as if these, his teammates, did not have parents and grandparents who fought for this country and came back to this country with all kinds of indignities. One of which has just been written about in a great book from South Carolina. Isaac Woodard was in his uniform, coming home from the war, when he was stopped by a sheriff, a law enforcement officer who beat him, punched his eyes out with a night stick. That's the thing that led Harry Truman to sign the executive order to integrate the armed services, because of the in indignities charged to a black man by a law enforcement officer, and that black man was in his uniform coming home from a war we had just won."

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image