Quantcast
Connect with us

‘Y’all think the president broke the law’: MSNBC analyst lectures Democrats for ‘losing’ on the impeachment question

Published

on

The NBC news national affairs analyst blasted Congressional Democrats on Monday for losing the battle over impeachment.

John Heilemann joined the panel on “Deadline: White House” with Nicolle Wallace, following Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) becoming the first Republican congressman to back impeachment.

Former Republican Congressman David Jolly of Florida explained how he viewed the developments.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Justin Amash has gone further than Nancy Pelosi did. I think we need to have Nancy Pelosi explain to the American people how she understands the Mueller report and if she understands it doesn’t rise to the level of impeachment, explain that,” Jolly said. “But right now, all we’re getting is a policy argument from Nancy Pelosi and arguments fall far short of what we got from Justin Amash over the weekend.”

MSNBC national affairs analyst John Heileman said Democrats are “losing” on both the politics and morality of impeachment.

“There’s not a Democrat, I believe — not one — who doesn’t believe the president hasn’t committed impeachable offenses on the basis of the Mueller report,” Heilemann argued. “Not one.”

“Democrats basically say, ‘Well, the president is a bad guy, may have broken the law, the president has maybe has committed impeachable offenses but we have to get to the bottom, maybe we should impeach, maybe later we shall impeach.’ The president says ‘No collusion, no obstruction.’ He’s winning the argument because he’s strong and wrong, but he’s strong and clear,” he continued.

“Democrats are all over the place. I have heard maybe more than a dozen Democrats say, ‘I believe the president has committed impeachable acts but we need to investigate it further’ — what? Y’all think the president broke the law … go and get the impeachment ball rolling.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“Even if there’s political risk, strong and wrong beats weak and right,” he noted.

“I don’t think they’re wrong about this, they don’t think they’re wrong either. All they’re doing is vacillating and prevaricating and mollifying — they’re stalling for time because they are afraid of what will happen if they lead,” he said.

“If you think that guys, it’s time to go,” he concluded. “Or stand up and go ‘we’re too weak and sad and too afraid to do this’ and then shut up about it. But the middle ground place they are now is not a winning position politically and it’s not the right place for them to be morally in terms of how history is going to judge them.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Watch:

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

From their balloons, the first aeronauts transformed our view of the world

Published

on

Near the beginning of the new film “The Aeronauts,” a giant gas-filled balloon called the “Mammoth” departs from London’s Vauxhall Gardens and ascends into the clouds, revealing a bird’s eye view of London.

To some moviegoers, these breathtaking views might seem like nothing special: Modern air travel has made many of us take for granted what we can see from the sky. But during the 19th century, the vast “ocean of air” above our heads was a mystery.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Awful new normal’: Anti-vaxxers have started physically confronting parents taking kids to get shots

Published

on

Anti-vaccination activists have taken a page from anti-abortion activists and have started standing outside clinics to physically confront people who are getting their children vaccinated.

NBC News reports that anti-vaxxers have decided that their online harassment and intimidation campaigns were not effective enough in dissuading parents from vaccinating their children, which is why they're now banking on face-to-face confrontations to get the job done.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Demand grows for Pete Buttigieg to come clean about his time at ‘corporate greed machine’ McKinsey

Published

on

"The political risk is not that his former employer, a multibillion-dollar corporate entity that promotes fraud across the globe, will be mad at him. It's what he would have to disclose."

Days after reports surfaced about the global consulting firm McKinsey's work advising the Trump administration on immigration policy, calls are growing louder for South Bend, Indiana mayor and 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg to disclose details about the work he did for the company.

Continue Reading