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Black Republican: Cops ‘treat their dogs better than they treat us’

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Black Republican political commentator Shermichael Singleton was part of a panel discussing the Phoenix police department that violently arrested the parents of a little girl who walked out of a dollar store with a doll.

The incident occurred months ago, but only now the footage is being released by police, revealing the way the family was treated.

Democratic strategist Joel Payne seemed appalled at the police in the video and the mark that likely left on the children who experienced it.

“I think about that young man talking about his child, and this is their first interaction with police,” he said, noting Father’s Day. “And that is the life, that’s the life lesson that that child is being taught is that in that moment, that police officer was trying to hurt her and to hurt her parents. That’s unacceptable.”

Host Rev. Al Sharpton explained that this issue had become a one-sided political issue, with Democrats supporting Black Lives Matter while Republicans have tried to claim it was a terrorist group.

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“Anyone could be victimized like this,” Sharpton said.

“No, you’re right,” said Singleton. “And I have no expectation that the Republican Party is going to do anything about this. And as an African-American, I don’t have a lot of hope that white people, in general, would do anything about this. Watching that video pissses me off. I’ve got to tell you there’s this characterization that black men we aren’t there for our kids, can our wives, girlfriends and there you have this young guy who is the same age as my brother. These people treat their dogs better than they treat us.”

“You’re a Republican saying this. If I said this, I’m a demagogue,” a surprised Sharpton cut in.”

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“Why would you tell a mother to put a baby on the ground?” Singleton continued.

“And she’s standing there pregnant holding the baby!” Sharpton agreed.

“It’s the same story in Minnesota with Philando Castile, the same thing when they hunted Trayvon Martin down, Eric Garner. When is it going to stop? It’s unacceptable,” concluded Payne.

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Watch the discussion below.


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Amazon workers strike as ‘Prime’ shopping frenzy hits

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Amazon workers walked out of a main distribution center in Minnesota on Monday, protesting for improved working conditions during the e-commerce titan's major "Prime" shopping event.

Amazon workers picketed outside the facility, briefly delaying a few trucks and waving signs with messages along the lines of "We're human, not robots."

"We know Prime Day is a big day for Amazon, so we hope this strike will help executives understand how serious we are about wanting real change that will uplift the workers in Amazon's warehouses," striker Safiyo Mohamed said in a release.

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Iran’s top diplomat warns US is ‘playing with fire’

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Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif warned Monday that the United States is "playing with fire," echoing remarks by President Donald Trump as the two sides are locked in a standoff over Tehran's nuclear program.

The United States quit an international deal aimed at curbing Iran's nuclear program last year, hitting Tehran with crippling sanctions.

Tensions have since soared, with the US calling off air strikes against Iran at the last minute after Tehran downed an American drone, and Washington blaming the Islamic republic for a series of attacks on tanker ships.

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At 82, NASA pioneer Sue Finley still reaching for the stars

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Sue Finley began work at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as the US prepared to launch its first satellite into orbit in 1958, racing to match the Soviet Union, which had accomplished the feat months earlier.

Now 82, she is one of NASA's longest-serving women, starting out as one of its "human computers," whose critical yet long-hidden contributions to the space program, including the Apollo missions to the Moon, are finally being recognized.

Finley had dropped out of college and joined a group of mathematically gifted individuals, overwhelmingly women, whose job it was to solve the complex equations thrown at them by rocket scientists before electronic computing became affordable and reliable.

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