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Hacker used $35 computer to steal restricted NASA data

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A hacker used a tiny Raspberry Pi computer to infiltrate NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory network, stealing sensitive data and forcing the temporary disconnection of space-flight systems, the agency has revealed.

The April 2018 attack went undetected for nearly a year, according to an audit report issued on June 18, and an investigation is still underway to find the culprit.

A Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized device sold for about $35 that plugs into home televisions and is used mainly to teach coding to children and promote computing in developing countries.

Prior to detection, the attacker was able to exfiltrate 23 files amounting to approximately 500 megabytes of data, the report from NASA’s Office of inspector General said.

These included two restricted files from the Mars Science Laboratory mission, which handles the Curiosity Rover, and information relating to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations which restrict the export of US defense and military technologies.

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“More importantly, the attacker successfully accessed two of the three primary JPL networks,” the report said.

“Officials were concerned the cyberattackers could move laterally from the gateway into their mission systems, potentially gaining access and initiating malicious signals to human space flight missions that use those systems.”

NASA came to question the integrity of its Deep Space Network data “and temporarily disconnected several space flight-related systems from the JPL network.”

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The breach came about as a result of a system administrator failing to update the database that determines which devices have access to the network. As a result, new devices could be added without proper vetting.

In response to the attack, the JPL “installed additional monitoring agents on its firewalls” and was reviewing network access agreements with its external partners, the report said.


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Stephen Colbert says Trump hates The Squad because ‘he’s the leader of the rival gang The Klan’

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Stephen Colbert

Stephen Colbert returned to "The Late Show" on Monday after a two-week summer vacation and wasted no time updating his viewers on the latest from "Racist-in-Chief" Donald Trump.

"There were some big stories while we were gone. The sun rose in the East, a bear relieved itself in the woods, Donald Trump was racist," Colbert said.

"And this wasn't just any run-of-the-mill, this was a humdinger. A new personal best at being the worst," he explained.

"Yesterday the president pinched out a steaming pile of tweets against freshman Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Oman of Minnesota, Ayanna Pressley of Massachuttes and Rashida Tlaib on Michigan -- known in DC as 'The Squad,'" Colbert said, while the audience clapped loudly at the mention of "The Squad."

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Seth Meyers hilariously ridicules Trump for not knowing the Constitution: ‘Article II — nobody’s ever seen it before’

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After a long vacation, late-night shows returned to bring some levity to the difficulty of the news cycle. Such was the case when "Late Night" host Seth Meyers ridiculed President Donald Trump for not knowing The Constitution that well.

"Number one: there's no crime. And how do you obstruct when there's no crime?" Trump asked during a brief statement Friday. Martha Stewart would take issue with that statement.

"Also take a look at one other thing. It's a thing called Article II. Nobody ever mentions Article II. It give me all these rights at a level nobody has ever seen before. We don't even talk about Article II," Trump said.

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MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow shows what Trump was trying to distract from with his latest racist attacks

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On Monday night, MSNBC's Rachel Maddow unpacked a number of critically important news stories that have been largely lost in the shuffle amid outrage over President Donald Trump's racist attacks on Democratic congresswomen — stories that could be critically important in coming weeks, and problematic for the president, but that he doubtless was grateful didn't dominate the cycle.

First, Maddow noted, there was "what they announced in terms of changes to asylum law ... maybe this president's most radical effort to change laws along racial lines since the Muslim ban that he tried to implement as soon as he got into office. It's part of a larger mosaic in terms of how the president is running and using race to get himself reelected." The law would ban any migrants from receiving asylum if they failed to apply for asylum in any country they passed through, which would be impractical or ineffective for many of them.

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