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Joe Sestak is the 24th Democratic candidate to enter the 2020 race

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Former Pennsylvania Representative and 3-star vice admiral in the US Navy, Joe Sestak, 67, has made history – as the 24th candidate to seek the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination.

The field is already saturated with candidates young, old, black, white, gay, straight, and every descriptor in between. Diversity – it’s a thing – and we embrace it. But 24?

Sestak announced his candidacy Sunday morning in a video posted on his website.

“My announcement may be later than others for the honor of seeking the Presidency,” he said, citing his daughter’s fight with brain cancer as the reason for his delay. “Throughout this past year, Alex again showed she is stronger than me, heroically beating the single digit odds once more, drawing on the fortitude of her Mom.”
Sestak previously vocalized his opposition to the 2003 invasion of Iraq – which he said “was justified as a preventive war by our leaders at the time, then embroiling us in its expanding conflict throughout the Middle East, into Africa and beyond as it created the more brutal terror of ISIS.”
Now, Sestak is utilizing those lessons in an effort to win the highest office in the nation.
“The hour has become late to restore US leadership to this liberal world order, but Iraq is our lesson to remember,” Sestak said in the video. “Democrats and Republicans alike who cast their votes for the tragic misadventure in Iraq showed little understanding that while militaries can stop a problem, they can never fix a problem.”
Speaking of problems, Sestak had a few words to share about the current POTUS situation.
“The president is not the problem; he is the symptom of the problem people see in a system that is not fair and accountable to the people,” Sestak said in his campaign video.
He added, “Americans know that we have more in common than we do differences. I know. I served with all of you in the global canvas of our Navy and served all of you as a Congressman. And now, as President, I will need all of you to help answer the call for America’s leadership to restore a just world order so it serves us by raising our collective good, here at home – done by my gaining your trust that I will always remain accountable to you alone.”
Sestak’s campaign kickoff will take place in the lobby of the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum in Waterloo, Iowa, Sunday afternoon.
Watch the video below.

Complete video text is available here.

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2020 Election

Here’s how Trump hopes to recreate his 2016 presidential win — and how Democrats can send him packing

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Writing for CNN on Saturday, election forecaster Harry Enten explained how President Donald Trump's recent, racist behavior lies in his desire to recreate the same electoral conditions that gave him a victory in 2016 in the presidential election next year.

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2020 Election

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2020 Election

Mitch McConnell’s big donors are Wall Street firms — and only 9% of his funds comes from Kentucky

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