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North Virginia pastor apologizes for praying for Trump

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President Donald Trump in the Oval Office. (Image via AFP/Saul Loeb.)

Pastor David Platt of McLean Bible Church in Northern Virginia apologized to his congregation after praying for President Donald Trump. Trump made an unannounced visit to the church to meet with McLean and to pray for the families and victims of Virginia Beach, that left 12 dead.

McLean noted that Trump’s policy and language had hurt members of his church, but explained that he tried his best to love and honor all people.

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“Sometimes we find ourselves in situations that we didn’t see coming, and we’re faced with a decision in a moment when we don’t have the liberty of deliberation, so we do our best to glorify God,” Platt said in a statement. “Today, I found myself in one of those situations.”

He added that he was not expecting the president’s visit and acted in the best way he knew how to.

“At the end of my sermon at the 1:00 worship gathering, I stepped to the side for what I thought would be a couple of moments in quiet reflection as we prepared to take the Lord’s Supper. But I was immediately called backstage and told that the President of the United States was on his way to the church, would be there in a matter of minutes, and would like for us to pray for him,” he said.

Adding, “This weighs heavy on my heart,” he continued. “I love every member of this church, and I only want to lead us with God’s Word in a way that transcends political party and position, heals the hurts of racial division and injustice, and honors every man and woman made in the image of God.”


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NY Times calls out Trump’s broken promises on creating a manufacturing renaissance in America

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When President Trump spoke at a 2018 groundbreaking ceremony for the Foxconn plant in Wisconsin, he promised the plant would provide thousands of jobs and would be the "eighth wonder of the world." But as the New York Times' Alan Rappeport points out, the company has hired "less than a quarter of the 2,080 workers it was expected to employ last year and invested just $300 million, rather than the expected $3.3 billion."

"Foxconn’s failure to create the kind of factory powerhouse that Mr. Trump described demonstrates how the president’s promise of an American manufacturing renaissance has not always resulted in the pledged jobs or economic investment," Rappeport writes. "Mr. Trump has threatened companies like General Motors, Harley-Davidson and Carrier with backbreaking taxes and boycotts if they moved manufacturing abroad, often cajoling job promises out of those firms. But in many cases, those pledges went unfulfilled once Mr. Trump’s attention shifted elsewhere and market realities could not be ignored."

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2020 Election

George Conway uses reverse rhetoric to rip Trump in WaPo: ‘I believe in the president, now more than ever’

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In a link-driven, satirical opinion piece for The Washington Post Monday, conservative attorney and Lincoln Project co-founder George Conway ripped Trump supporters with his reverse rhetoric by writing a parody of what one might say in defense of the president with just over a week until Election Day.

"I believe, more than ever, in the president," Conway began his post. "I believe Sleepy Joe Biden and that 'monster' Kamala D. Harris would turn America into a 'socialist hellhole,' and we’d all have 'to speak Chinese.'"

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In rural America, resentment over COVID-19 shutdowns is colliding with rising case numbers

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As COVID-19 spreads through rural America, new infection numbers are rising to peaks not seen during this pandemic and pushing hospitals to their limits. Many towns are experiencing their first major outbreaks, but that doesn’t mean rural communities had previously been spared the devastating impacts of the pandemic.

Infection rates in rural and frontier communities ebbed and flowed during the first seven months, often showing up in pockets linked to meat packing plants, nursing homes or prisons.

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