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Paris authorities to remove scaffolding from collapsed spire of Notre-Dame cathedral

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Paris authorities will begin the delicate task of removing scaffolding from the collapsed spire of Notre-Dame cathedral in coming weeks after a devastating fire in April, a charity said Monday.

The 850-year-old church’s spire was clad in scaffolding when it came crashing during the huge blaze on April 15.

The cathedral’s roof was also destroyed in the inferno, although the vast majority of the most-sacred artefacts and valuable items inside were saved.

Shortly after the fire, French President Emmanuel Macron pledged to complete a painstaking renovation of the gothic masterpiece within five years.

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But that cannot begin until “essential” work takes place to secure the structure, the Notre-Dame Foundation charity said in a statement.

“One of the most complex aspects of the work at the moment is removing the scaffolding, which includes 50,000 tubes which reached over 800 degrees Celcius (1472 degrees Fahrenheit)” during the fire, charity head Christophe-Charles Rousselot told AFP.

“A similar structure will be installed, as well as cranes, in order to start cutting down (the scaffolding) in very delicate conditions,” the charity statement said.

Dismantling the scaffolding is expected to take four months, Rousselot said.

Notre-Dame hosted its first mass after the inferno earlier this month, with priests and worshippers donning hard hats to protect themselves against possible falling debris.

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Wealthy donors have handed over millions of euros to restore the church, including French luxury goods rivals Bernard Arnault and Francois-Henri Pinault, who have pledged 200 and 100 million euros ($228 million and $114 million) respectively.

The full amount needed to restore the cathedral is not yet known, the Notre-Dame Foundation said.

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This psychological analysis of Trump supporters has exposed 5 alarming traits about them

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The lightning-fast ascent and political invincibility of Donald Trump has left many experts baffled and wondering, “How did we get here?” Any accurate and sufficient answer to that question must not only focus on Trump himself, but also on his uniquely loyal supporters. Given their extreme devotion and unwavering admiration for their highly unpredictable and often inflammatory leader, some have turned to the field of psychology for scientific explanations based on precise quantitative data and established theoretical frameworks.

Although analyses and studies by psychologists and neuroscientists have provided many thought-provoking explanations for his enduring support, the accounts of different experts often vary greatly, sometimes overlapping and other times conflicting. However insightful these critiques may be, it is apparent that more research and examination is needed to hone in on the exact psychological and social factors underlying this peculiar human behavior.

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Here are 5 key takeaways from the House Judiciary Committee’s impeachment report

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The 658-page impeachment report finds that President Donald Trump committed multiple federal crimes and "betrayed the national interest."

The House Judiciary Committee published the full report early Monday, ahead of a vote likely this week, and laid out the case that Trump had abused his power and obstructed Congress in its oversight role, reported Axios.

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Disgraced Weinstein says world forgets he ‘pioneered’ women in film

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Disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein has complained that the world has forgotten how he "pioneered" casting women prominently in his films, following dozens of sex-crime allegations that left him feeling "eviscerated."

The once-powerful film producer, whose case sparked the #MeToo movement against sexual harassment, faces a criminal trial next month that could see him jailed for life.

In an interview with the New York Post tabloid, the 67-year-old said: "I feel like the forgotten man."

"I made more movies directed by women and about women than any filmmaker and I'm talking about 30 years ago.

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