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Trump-bashing gets physical at China tech show

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The not-for-sale prototype serves as a proxy for more oblique Trump-bashing heard at the annual tech fair.

“It would be better if I could use my hands and feet. I think the hammer isn’t satisfying enough,” attendee Wang Dongyue, 31, said after sending the presidential noggin lurching back and forth.

“I don’t have a good impression of him to be frank, because he’s not very friendly to China now.”

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AFP / HECTOR RETAMAL A series of delighted visitors took their turns bashing Trump at the ‘stress-relief’ station, set up by Japanese tech firm Soliton Systems

The trade show, which is organised by the US Consumer Technology Association (CTA), opened this week under the shadow of the escalating trade war.

China and the United States have hit each other with steep tariffs on more than $360 billion in bilateral trade, rattling financial markets and business confidence.

Technology is a key battleground, with the United States pressing governments across the world to drop Chinese telecom giant Huawei from their 5G network development plans, saying it could be used by Beijing for espionage.

Huawei denies the charge.

On Tuesday, Huawei’s chief strategist Shao Yang said in a keynote that the company’s target of surpassing Samsung as the world’s number one smartphone manufacturer by late 2019 “may take longer” now, without elaborating.

CES Asia, which ends on Thursday, is a branch of the main CES held in Las Vegas.

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There was little evidence of any gloom clouding the fair, a lively showcase of the latest in the gadget world including artificial intelligence, self-driving cars, facial recognition products, and other digital developments.

But CTA President Gary Shapiro, in an opening speech, warned that no one wins a tariff war.

“Simply put, a trade war is bad for everyone involved,” he said.

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A series of delighted visitors took their turns bashing Trump at the “stress-relief” station, set up by Japanese tech firm Soliton Systems.

At one point, a young Chinese girl began crying after coming face-to-face with the pouty-faced bobble-head.

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“They should have a boxing glove. That would feel better,” show attendee Liu Di said after watching visitors take their licks.

Takenori Ohira, a manager with Soliton Systems’ AI robots and Internet of Things (IoT) division, said Chinese visitors were “very excited” with the display.

“The reason we chose Trump is because he is in a sense very outstanding among all the American presidents from the past,” he said slyly.

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“That is why we chose him.”


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Eric Trump bragged about the stock market as the US crossed 100,000 dead — and it didn’t go well

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On Wednesday, the number of reported coronavirus deaths in the United States officially hit the 100,000 mark — a milestone experts have been anticipating for days.

But at the same time, President Donald Trump's second son chose to take the moment to brag about how the stock market was doing.

GREAT DAY for the DOW!! https://t.co/t0cK3wOKUu

— Eric Trump (@EricTrump) May 27, 2020

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Navajo Nation got masks from a former Trump official — that ‘are not approved by the FDA’: report

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ProPublica revealed last week that Zach Fuentes, President Donald Trump’s former deputy chief of staff, formed a company in early April and 11 days later won a $3 million contract with IHS to provide specialized respirator masks to the agency for use in Navajo hospitals. The contract was granted with limited competitive bidding.

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‘There needs to be a prosecution’ of cop who killed George Floyd: CNN guest says ‘call it what it is’

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On CNN Wednesday, criminal defense attorney Joey Jackson walked through why the Minneapolis police officer responsible for George Floyd's suffocation death must be prosecuted.

"Bottom line, question here from looking at this, should the officer face charges?" asked host Erin Burnett.

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