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Trump’s latest plan for immigrant children leaves Americans sickened and horrified

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Lending even greater significance to the parallels commentators and historians have drawn between U.S. migrant detention centers and concentration camps of the past, the Trump administration is reportedly planning to hold more than a thousand immigrant children at an Oklahoma army base that was used as an internment camp for Japanese Americans during World War II.

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According to Time, Fort Sill “has been selected to detain 1,400 children until they can be given to an adult relative.”

“Fort Sill, located southwest of Oklahoma City, was one of several internment camps where Japanese-Americans were held during World War II,” Time reported. “Between 1942 and 1946, the U.S. government forcibly removed an estimated 120,000 men, women and children from their homes and incarcerated them across the country. Fort Sill was later used to hold German prisoners of war.”

As Time pointed out, the horrific practice of detaining immigrants at the site of a former internment camp did not begin with Trump.

“In 2014, the Obama administration placed around 7,700 migrant children on bases in Texas, California, and Oklahoma, including Fort Sill. The temporary shelters were shuttered after four months,” Time reported. Under Obama, Fort Sill was used to detain around 200 children.

News of the Trump administration’s decision to send over a thousand children to the base as it detains a record number of immigrants was met with horror.

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California’s Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom tweeted, “This is sick.”

“We will look back at this moment in time and ask ourselves what we did to put a stop to these horrific, inhumane policies. Speak up. Speak out. Be on the right side of history.”

Echoing a sentiment that was common across social media, Yale legal scholar Tiffany Li added, “Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.”

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As Time reported, the Trump administration has detained more than 40,000 children this year alone.

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“That’s a 57 percent increase from last year, which is a rate on-pace to surpass the record figures in 2016, when 59,171 minors were taken into custody,” according to Time.


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Paul Krugman: GOP would ‘cheer on’ Trump if he launched ‘a military coup’

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New York Times columnist Paul Krugman on Friday warned that it's wrong to compare President Donald Trump to President Richard Nixon, on the grounds that Trump is far worse and more dangerous.

Krugman acknowledges that there are some similarities between Trump and Nixon, such as their willingness to use racial grievance to gain power and their cavalier attitude toward obeying the law.

But Krugman thinks that the biggest difference between Trump and Nixon is that the Republican Party of 2020 is not the same as the Republican Party that pushed Nixon out in 1974.

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Last redoubt: Pygmies return to forest to isolate against coronavirus

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Dzanga-Sangha, a wildlife sanctuary in southwest Central African Republic, is a remote place, linked to the rest of the world by a narrow trail that becomes impassable in heavy rain.

But for the region's Pygmies -- outcasts in a country already ranked among the poorest in the world -- Dzanga-Sangha's isolation could be a blessing.

As coronavirus spreads in the CAR, with more than 1,000 cases officially recorded and four deaths, a campaign has been launched to encourage the Bayaka people, who divide their time between the village and the forest, to hole up in the reserve.

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Disturbing video exposes the dangerous message a State Patrol officer told team: ‘Don’t kill them, but hit them hard’

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Krystal Marx, the executive director of Seattle Pride, shared a disturbing video this week revealing the violent message an officer in the Washington State Patrol gave to his team as it prepared to confront protesters.

“Don’t kill them, but hit them hard,” he said as he walked through a group of his colleagues.

“I remember shaking,” Marx told the Seattle Times of the experience filming the patrol from her office window. “Why not say, ‘Restrain them, calmly’?”

Chris Loftis, a spokesperson for the patrol, gave the Times a statement trying to explain away the comment as poor “word choice,” but it was not reassuring:

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