Quantcast
Connect with us

WATCH: Trump lashes out at Kamala Harris saying that she will prosecute him

Published

on

President Donald Trump was furious after he was told Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) would prosecute him if she was elected in 2020, the New York Post noted.

“I believe that they would have no choice and that they should, yes,” Harris told the NPR Politics Podcast, citing Robert Mueller’s report with 10 cases of obstruction of justice.

Trump was informed about the comments during an interview with ABC News’ George Stephanopoulos Wednesday. The president said she was only saying that because she’s running for office.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Oh, give me a break. She’s running for president, she’s doing horribly, she’s way down in the polls,” Trump said in a clip that was broadcast Thursday. “I must say, Pocahontas is really cleaning her clock.”

He went on to admit that if he were Harris, he’d probably say the same thing.

“I heard she made that statement,” Trump said. “And you know what? Who wouldn’t? Probably if I were running in her position, I’d make the same statement.”

“Donald Trump is using the Department of Justice to run interference on his own behalf, and he’s appointed an Attorney General to act like his personal defense lawyer, not the lawyer for the American people,” the Harris campaign said in a comment.

“Senator Harris believes no one is above the law, not even the President of the United States, and as president, she would restore an independent DOJ that values the rule of law and follows facts and evidence wherever they lead,” Harris campaign spokesman Ian Sams said in a statement.

ADVERTISEMENT

See the clip of the video below:

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

This psychological analysis of Trump supporters has exposed 5 alarming traits about them

Published

on

The lightning-fast ascent and political invincibility of Donald Trump has left many experts baffled and wondering, “How did we get here?” Any accurate and sufficient answer to that question must not only focus on Trump himself, but also on his uniquely loyal supporters. Given their extreme devotion and unwavering admiration for their highly unpredictable and often inflammatory leader, some have turned to the field of psychology for scientific explanations based on precise quantitative data and established theoretical frameworks.

Although analyses and studies by psychologists and neuroscientists have provided many thought-provoking explanations for his enduring support, the accounts of different experts often vary greatly, sometimes overlapping and other times conflicting. However insightful these critiques may be, it is apparent that more research and examination is needed to hone in on the exact psychological and social factors underlying this peculiar human behavior.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

New Zealand eruption death toll rises to 18

Published

on

The death toll from New Zealand's White Island volcano eruption rose to 18 Sunday, including two people whose bodies have not been recovered, police said.

A land search early Sunday failed to find any sign of the missing pair and divers returned to the sea in the afternoon amid increasing speculation both could be in the water.

Deputy police commissioner Mike Clement said there was "every chance" the bodies had been washed into the sea from the stream where they were last seen Monday.

He added that searchers were "satisfied that the area we searched near the jetty is clear of the bodies".

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Anger, relief but no joy as UN climate talks limp to an end

Published

on

A marathon UN summit wrapped up Sunday with little to show, squeezing hard-earned compromises from countries over a global warming battle plan that fell well short of what science says is needed to tackle the climate crisis.

The COP25 deal "expresses the urgent need" for new carbon cutting commitments to close the gap between current emissions and the Paris treaty goal of capping temperature at below two degrees, host country Spain said in a statement.

"Today the citizens of the world are asking for us to move ahead faster and better, in financing, adaptation, mitigation," Carolina Schmidt, Chilean environment minister and President of COP25, told the closing plenary.

Continue Reading