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Consumption of sugary drinks linked with cancer risk: study

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Consumption of sugary drinks such as soda and fruit juice is linked to a higher risk of developing certain kinds of cancer, researchers reported on Thursday.

The consumption of sugary drinks has exploded worldwide in recent decades and the high-calorie beverages have already been associated with a elevated risk of obesity — itself recognised as a leading cancer risk factor.

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A team of researchers in France wanted to assess the associations between heightened consumption of sugar drinks and the risks of overall cancer, as well as several cancer types, including breast, prostate and bowel cancers.

They surveyed more than 100,000 adults, with an average of age of 42, 79 percent of whom were women.

The participants, who were followed for a maximum of nine years, completed at least two 24-hour online validated dietary questionnaires, calculating their daily consumption of sugar and artificially sweetened beverages as well as 100 percent fruit juices.

Researchers measured the daily intakes of sugary drinks against those of diet beverages and compared them to cancer cases in participants’ medical records during the follow-up period.

They found that just a 100 ml increase per day of sugary drinks was associated with an 18 percent increased risk of cancer, and with a 22 percent increase in breast cancer.

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Both sugar-sweetened drinks and fruit juices saw a similar higher risk association.

During a follow-up, researchers found 2,193 cases of cancer were diagnosed, the average age at diagnosis being 59 years.

Authors of the study, which appeared in the BMJ medical journal, stressed their work was based on observation and so could not establish the cause of cancer prognoses.

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But the sample size was large and they adjusted for a number of other influential factors.

Its authors suggested that, based on their findings, taxing sugary products could have a significant impact on cancer rates.

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“This large, well-designed study adds to the existing evidence that consumption of sugary drinks may be associated with increased risk of some cancers,” Graham Wheeler, senior statistician of the Cancer Research UK said of the study.


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With support of just one Republican, House passes ‘historic’ bill to restore and expand voting rights

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Brian Fitzpatrick

"Brings us one step closer to restoring the Voting Rights Act."

Just one Republican—Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania—joined a united House Democratic caucus on Friday to pass what rights groups hailed as "historic" legislation to restore and expand voter protections that were gutted by the Supreme Court in 2013.

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Florida governor says ‘Saudi Arabia needs to make things better’ after gunman kills three at Naval Air Station Pensacola

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A Saudi air force trainee opened fire on Friday at a US naval base, killing three people before being shot dead by police, officials said.

The shooting, which took place at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida, left eight people injured including two sheriff's deputies who responded to the attack.

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said the shooter was from Saudi Arabia -- the same nationality as 15 of the 19 men involved in the 9/11 attacks, some of whom attended flight school in Florida.

"There's obviously going to be a lot of questions about this individual being a foreign national, being a part of the Saudi air force and then to be here training on our soil," DeSantis told a press conference.

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Trump’s ‘narcissistic personality disorder’ is holding America’s foreign policy hostage: conservative columnist

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In an op-ed for the conservative outlet The Bulwark, Richard North Patterson argues that the world is being "held hostage to an unwell president" --  a reference to what he sees are President Trump's "deep personal pathologies."

In his piece, Patterson cites the Mayo Clinic's definition of "narcissistic personality disorder," which is described as “a mental condition in which people have an inflated sense of their own importance, a deep need for excessive attention and admiration, troubled relationships, and a lack of empathy for others," adding that "beneath this mask of extreme confidence lies a fragile self-esteem that’s vulnerable to the slightest criticism."

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