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‘Detoxify these people’: Fox News host proposes to ‘institutionalize’ the homeless

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Fox News host Jesse Watters asserted on Wednesday that the government should “institutionalize” all homeless people.

On the Fox News program Outnumbered, host Lisa Boothe asked if liberal policies in California were “serving as a magnet” for homeless people.

“That and the weather,” Watters agreed. “Because it’s so beautiful out there. It’s not about the money, it’s about the mission. Do you want them to feel comfortable sleeping on the streets or do you want to get them off the streets? I think you have to get them off the streets.”

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According to Watters, Democrats are behaving like “loose parents” who let their teenage children “drink or smoke in the house, no curfew, no bedtime.”

“What happened to those kids?” he asked. “They didn’t turn out so well. You need tough love in California.”

He added: “You need to go in there, clean it up, institutionalize these people, detoxify these people, put them in rehab facilities, put them in halfway housing, and affordable subsidized housing. Then clean the streets up. Because right now police officers are getting sick just walking the beat.”

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) criticized President Donald Trump this week for proposing budget cuts to programs for the homeless.

“If interceding means cutting budgets to support services to get people off the street, he’s been very successful in advancing those provisions in addition to the massive Social Security cuts and Medicare cuts — two things he promised he wouldn’t do,” Newsom said.

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Watch the video below from Fox News.

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Trump lawyer goes down in flames trying to explain away Bill Barr’s corruption

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On Monday's edition of CNN's "Anderson Cooper 360," former federal prosecutor Elie Honig took former Trump White House lawyer Jim Schultz to the cleaners when he tried to defend Attorney General William Barr's conduct.

Schultz initially tried to claim that the 2,000 federal prosecutors calling for Barr's resignation had a political axe to grind. "You have a lot of folks that have a partisan agenda pushing this thing out, before the facts have really, have really been discovered, as it relates to what happened," said Schultz. "And Barr is vehement about stating that, you know, that decision was made long before any of the tweets, long before — and before the president made my statements on this matter ... he has to have the trust in the folks that are working below him."

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Conflict of interest? Pro-Trump super PAC affiliates are cashing in on one key administration project

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The term “conflict of interest” has repeatedly come up in connection with Donald Trump’s presidency, often in connection with Republicans being encouraged to hold events in Trump properties. But a different type of Trump-related cronyism is being reported in the Arizona Daily Star: according to the Star’s Curt Prendergast, a company that is helping construct a border wall in Arizona has ties to a Trump-friendly PAC (political action committee).

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Are Democrats abandoning oversight of Trump and the GOP as he becomes more dangerous than ever?

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House Democrats are pivoting away from investigations of President Donald Trump and toward economic issues and healthcare for the 2020 general election in November, according to a New York Times report, and shelving—for now—intentions to subpoena former National Security Advisor John Bolton and, in the eyes of critics, giving the president carte blanche on his machinations in the Justice Department.

The shift toward so-called "kitchen table issues" and a deprioritization of investigations raised eyebrows as political observers noted that Trump has only been emboldened by acquittal and that DOJ is currently roiled in a scandal over the president's pressuring of Attorney General William Barr on prosecutions.

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