Quantcast
Connect with us

First US murder conviction overturned using DNA, family tree evidence

Published

on

An American man was exonerated Wednesday for a decades-old murder he did not commit, using evidence based on DNA and a genetic family tree, the first such result using a revolutionary investigative technique.

Christopher Tapp, 43, had served 20 of his 30-year sentence for the 1996 rape and murder of Angie Dodge.

On Wednesday, a court in the state of Idaho completely overturned his conviction based on evidence found with “genetic genealogy” — the technique used to identify the suspected “Golden State Killer” by making DNA matches with his distant relatives.

ADVERTISEMENT

“It’s a new life, a new beginning, a new world for me, and I’m just gonna enjoy every day,” Tapp said at the end of the hearing, local media reported.

Tapp’s exoneration came after police arrested another suspect, Brian Dripps, in May. Dripps, who was identified using genetic genealogy, confessed to the crime.

Genetic genealogy first made headlines in April 2018, after it was used to find the alleged “Golden State Killer” in California who is blamed for 12 murders and more than 50 rapes dating back to the mid-1970s.

In that case — as well as about 70 others that have been solved since — DNA found at crime scenes was compared to the databases for genealogy websites.

The websites — widely advertised in the United States — allow users to post DNA test results and then generate a list of people with similar genomes, enabling users to find distant relatives.

ADVERTISEMENT

The databases also allow police officers to search through people with similar genetic profiles to DNA found at crime scenes. Tracing back through family trees and seeing where the DNA crosses can lead investigators to a suspect.

But Tapp’s case is the first in which genetic genealogy has been used to prove innocence.

“It’s just such an incredible feeling to be a part of clearing an innocent man’s name,” CeCe Moore, the genetic genealogist who worked on the case, said in an interview with ABC.

ADVERTISEMENT

The case against Tapp began to crumble before investigators started to use genetic genealogy.

In 1998, Tapp was sentenced to 30 years in prison based solely on his confession, which he then retracted.

ADVERTISEMENT

In 2017, he was freed from prison in a court agreement, but the murder charge was not dropped.

A year later, his defense team obtained the right to test sperm traces found in Angie Dodge’s bedroom. Genetic genealogy led investigators to Brian Dripps.

Dripps, who in 1996 lived just across the street from Dodge, confessed to the crime after officers tested a cigarette butt he had thrown away against the crime scene DNA.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Idaho Bonneville County prosecutor withdrew the charges against Tapp and filed a motion to exonerate him, which a judge endorsed on Wednesday.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

French directors guild to propose suspending Polanski

Published

on

A French organisation of more than 200 film-makers said Monday it will propose new rules for members charged or convicted of sexual violence, which could lead to the suspension of French-Polish director Roman Polanski.

The board of the ARP directors' guild voted to present to its members "new procedures to suspend any member facing legal charges, and expel any member convicted, especially for crimes of a sexual nature," said Pierre Jolivet, ARP president.

The proposed rules for suspension "would affect Roman Polanski whose judicial case is still open in the United States and for which he has been charged," Jolivet added

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump official Mina Chang quits after being busted inflating her resumé

Published

on

President Donald Trump has lost another top official in his State Department, days after Marie Yovanovitch testified the department had been "hollowed out."

"Mina Chang, a high-ranking State Department staffer who vaulted into the public spotlight after NBC reported she had inflated her resumé, has resigned from her position," Politico reported Monday.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Popular right-wing radio host says he was fired in the middle of his show for criticizing Trump

Published

on

Liberals and progressives aren’t the only ones right-wing media can be unfair to: they can also be horribly unfair to conservatives. And one of them appears to be radio host Craig Silverman, who says he was fired by Denver’s KNUS 710 AM on Saturday for criticizing President Donald Trump on the air.

As much as right-wing outlets complain about “political correctness” and hypersensitive liberal “snowflakes” who are intolerant of other points of view, those same outlets often expect their employees to be in total lockstep politically — which, in 2019, often means not saying a word against Trump. According to Silverman, he was doing a segment on the late right-wing attorney Roy Cohn (who represented Trump in the 1970s) when KNUS’ program director entered the studio and told him, “You’re done.”

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image