Quantcast
Connect with us

Rush Limbaugh admits his attacks on Obama were ‘bogus’ as he attempts to defend Trump

Published

on

Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh admitted that Republican fear-mongering over the federal deficit under President Obama was “bogus,” while defending the deficit’s explosive rise to $1 trillion under President Trump.

This article originally appeared at Salon.

During Limbaugh’s show on Tuesday, a caller suggested that Republicans should nominate a young fiscal conservative instead of Trump, citing the rising deficit. Limbaugh dismissed the concerns, declaring that fiscal conservatism was basically a sham all along.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Republicans can nominate a young, potentially two-term president, one that believes in fiscal conservatism,” the caller told Limbaugh. “We’re gonna have — in 2019, there’s gonna be a $1 trillion deficit. Trump doesn’t really care about that. He’s not really a fiscal conservative. We don’t, we have to acknowledge that Trump has been cruelly used.”

“Nobody is a fiscal conservative anymore,” Limbaugh shot back. “All this talk about concern for the deficit and the budget has been bogus for as long as it’s been around.”

That’s quite the statement from Limbaugh, who spent the entirety of the Obama years attacking the president over rising deficits.

In 2009, Limbaugh ranted that Obama was a “coward” without the “spine” or “gonads” to admit he was responsible for driving up the deficit (rather than the two wars President George W. Bush started while cutting taxes).

In 2011, Limbaugh bizarrely claimed that Obama was “the architect of deficits and debt unheard of in this nation.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The late Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., spent the entirety of his 2008 presidential campaign warning about rising deficits, CNN noted. The 2010 rise of the Tea Party, which fueled massive Republican gains in that year’s midterm elections, was fueled largely by claims that federal spending was out of control. Former House Speaker Paul Ryan made an entire career out of rhetoric decrying the rising national debt. Then he led the charge to approve a $1.5 trillion tax cut for the rich and corporations, leading to the $1 trillion deficit Republicans apparently no longer care about.

Trump himself vowed to be a savior, promising that he would eliminate not just the budget deficit but the entire $22 trillion debt within two terms as president during his 2016 campaign.

“It can be done. … It will take place and it will go relatively quickly. … If you have the right people, like, in the agencies and the various people that do the balancing … you can cut the numbers by two pennies and three pennies and balance a budget quickly and have a stronger and better country,” Trump told Fox News host Sean Hannity in 2016.

ADVERTISEMENT

Later on Tuesday’s show, Limbaugh doubled down on his newfound believe that fiscal conservatism was never authentic, accusing former Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., of fear-mongering for expressing concern over the rising national debt under Trump. (Sanford has proposed mounting a campaign against Trump for the Republican nomination in 2020.)

“How many years have people tried to scare everybody about the deficit?” Limbaugh asked. “The years, how many decades of politicians tried to scare us about deficit the national debt, the deficit, any number of things. And yet, here we’re still here and the great jaws of the deficit have not bitten off our heads and chewed them up and spit them out.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Igor Derysh is a New York-based political writer whose work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, Boston Herald and Baltimore Sun.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Laura Ingraham wants to remove Adam Schiff from Congress: ‘It’s not clear that congressmen can’t be impeached’

Published

on

Fox News host Laura Ingraham floated a novel legal theory on Monday in an attempt to remove Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) from Congress: that members of Congress can be impeached.

"It’s not clear that congressmen can’t be impeached, by the way," Laura Ingraham told Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA).

"It's not clear that they cannot be impeached," she repeated.

Ingraham was simply wrong on the facts, the constitution does not allow the impeachment of members of Congress.

The constitutional mechanism to remove a member of Congress before the end of their two-year term is for two-thirds of the body to vote to expel the member.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

50 million trapped after China sealed off cities as virus death toll surges

Published

on

The United States and other nations raced to get their citizens out of the locked-down Chinese city at ground-zero of a virus epidemic on Tuesday, as the death toll surged to 106 and the number of confirmed infections doubled to over 4,500.

The deadly virus, which experts believe emanated from a wild animal market in the city of Wuhan last month, has triggered a desperate Chinese containment effort after spreading nationwide and to more than a dozen other countries.

The government has sealed off Wuhan and other cities in central Hubei province, effectively trapping more than 50 million people, including thousands of foreigners, in a bid to contain the virus as the high-travel Lunar New Year holiday unfolds.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Internet smashes ‘hack’ Alan Dershowitz’s argument as ‘contrary to law and fact’

Published

on

As Alan Dershowitz went up to defend President Donald Trump Monday evening, he faced off against the increasingly more popular episode of "The Bachelor," who beat the lawyer in the Twitter horse-race of national trends.

Lawyers took to Twitter to respond to the argument outlined by Dershowitz and dispute his assessment of the law. Even Dershowitz admitted to the Senate that his is a "minority view," something legal scholars noted was because it is "wrong."

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image