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Trump’s racism is ‘disqualifying’ for him to remain as president: former White House lawyer

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Former acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal explained on MSNBC on Thursday why he viewed President Donald Trump’s racist attacks on four women of color in Congress as disqualifying.

Anchor Brian Williams read a quote from Susan Glasser of The New Yorker.

“Half of the country is appalled but not really sure how to combat him; the other half is cheering, or at least averting its gaze. This is what a political civil war looks like, with words, for now, as weapons,” Glasser wrote.

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“Neil, I’d like to ask you a more personal question. As a South Asian-American, in the history of Supreme Court jurisprudence, your position is now cemented for all time,” Williams noted. “As an American, in the history of Supreme Court jurisprudence, your position is cemented for all time. And yet, you have a near-daily familiarity with the phrase ‘go back to where you came from.'”

“Yeah, I heard it my whole life,” Katyal replied. “It started when I was three years old and it continues on.”

“This is about a very simple idea, which is we respect people who come here from other countries and, frankly, three of them didn’t, they just happen to have brown skin. But we respect people who come here from other countries. We don’t care about that. That’s what we fought a civil war about,” he explained.

“So what’s lost, Brian, I think what’s lost is the sense of civic communication and fairness and watching this breakdown in the president — who is cheering it on, who hopes for this — as opposed to a president who doesn’t necessarily have to always bring us together, there are always divisions, but to prey on the racial divisions and the kind of hurt and pain that people feel, I mean, I can’t think of something more disqualifying to be president of the United States than the way he has behaved this week,” he explained.

“And I’m critical of his obstruction of justice and his conspiracy and all sorts of other things, but this is a true betrayal of everything the country is all about,” Katyal added.

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Trump official who doesn’t want poor people to have publicly-funded healthcare wants public to pay for stolen Ivanka jewelry

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President Donald Trump's official in charge of Medicare and Medicaid, Seema Verma, came under fire after Politico reported Saturday that she submitted a $47,000 claim for reimbursement on the taxpayers' dime for stolen, uninsured items items.

https://twitter.com/RepJayapal/status/1203673974867210240

The bulk of the claim—for which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) ultimately reimbursed her $2,852.40—was for roughly $43,000 worth of jewelry. Among the roughly two dozen pieces was an Ivanka Trump brand pendant whose estimated value was $5,900, according to documents obtained by Politico. A $325 claim for moisturizer was also among the items included.

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Injuries feared as popular New Zealand volcano erupts

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New Zealand's White Island volcano erupted suddenly on Monday, prompting fears for a group of visitors seen walking on the crater floor moments before.

The country's National Emergency Management Agency said a "moderate volcanic eruption is occurring at White Island and is hazardous in the immediate vicinity of the volcano."

Cameras providing a live feed from the volcano showed more than half a dozen people walking inside the rim at 2:10 pm local time (0110 GMT), before images went dark when the eruption occurred minutes later.

The local mayor said she feared there had been "injuries" in the eruption.

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Why Colbert got serious — and why Donald Trump isn’t funny

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In her new book, “Irony and Outrage: The Polarized Landscape of Rage, Fear, and Laughter in the United States,” Dannagal Goldthwaite Young advances the argument that the ironic satire of "The Daily Show" and the outrage programming of Fox News — which debuted within months of each other — play remarkably similar roles for their respective audiences, speaking to their distinctively liberal and conservative psychological orientations to motivate not just voter loyalty, but political engagement.

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