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Apology over New Zealand mosque accused’s ‘hateful’ letter

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Officials in New Zealand apologized Thursday after the alleged Christchurch mosque gunman was allowed to send a letter from prison espousing “hateful” views that a supporter then shared online.

Australian Brenton Tarrant is in a maximum-security jail in Auckland awaiting trial for the murder of 51 Muslim worshippers on March 15 in the worst mass shooting in modern New Zealand history.

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Yet despite the government vowing to deny Tarrant a platform to disseminate hate speech, corrections officials revealed he had been allowed to send mail from his prison cell.

One of the letters from the self-avowed white supremacist, addressed to a Russian man named Alan, was posted to the website 4Chan.

Handwritten in block letters, the six-page note discusses a trip Tarrant made to Russia in 2015, his admiration for British fascist Oswald Mosley and his belief “there is a great conflict on the horizon”.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, who has vowed never to mention Tarrant by name, was furious the letter had bypassed the correction department’s vetting system.

“Corrections themselves have acknowledged the failing here… this individual should not be able to share his hateful message from behind prison doors,” she told reporters in Tuvalu, where she is attending a regional summit.

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Corrections Department chief executive Christine Stevenson said the letter should never have been sent.

“I would like to apologise for the distress that this has caused to those impacted by the tragic events of 15 March,” she said.

– ‘Fine balance’ –

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Stevenson said Tarrant’s mail privileges had been suspended while screening processes were reviewed.

“It is a fine balance to uphold our lawful obligations and mitigate all potential risks posed by the prisoner,” she said.

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“However, we are absolutely committed to ensuring that he has no opportunity to cause harm or distress, either directly or indirectly.”

Corrections Minister Kelvin Davis said that before the mail ban, Tarrant had sent nine letters while in custody: two to his mother and seven to “associates”, two of which were stopped by officials.

Davis said managing the 28-year-old was a challenge for the prison system.

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“The thing is, we’ve never dealt with a prisoner like this before,” he told Radio New Zealand.

“I’ve asked whether our laws are actually fit for purpose. I’ve asked corrections for advice on where they think we need to make changes.”

Tarrant allegedly opened fire in the packed Al Noor mosque during Friday prayers on March 15, and then travelled across town to continue the carnage in the suburban Linwood mosque, while livestreaming his actions on social media.

He is scheduled to stand trial in May next year on 51 counts of murder, 40 of attempted murder and engaging in a terrorist act.

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His case came before the Christchurch High Court on Thursday for a brief hearing on procedural matters, although Tarrant was not required to appear via audio-visual link, as he has previously.

The case was adjourned until October 3, when the court is expected to make a decision on whether to move the trial away from Christchurch.


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GOPer Collins battered for demand to postpone Trump impeachment so he can get caught up: ‘Collins doesn’t do his homework’

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On Saturday, Rep. Doug Collins (R-GA), the senior Republican on the House Judiciary Committee made a demand to the Democrats that they postpone Monday's hearing on the impeachment of Donald Trump, saying he needed more time to digest a fifty-plus page report that Democrats released over the weekend.

After tweeting out his demand -- as well as issuing a statement -- the voluble Trump defenders was hammered on his own Twitter feed with commenters telling him do his job and read the report in the meantime.

After Collins tweeted, "Chairman Nadler has no choice but to postpone Monday’s hearing in the wake of a last-minute document transmission that shows just how far Democrats have gone to pervert basic fairness," he got buried in derision.

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Trump’s damage to the federal government is driving voters to turn to more liberal candidates: report

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According to a report from Politico, Donald Trump's tenure has not resulted in voters becoming more conservative, and instead, he is driving them into the arms of more liberal and progressive candidates at the local level who are then using their newfound power to change Democratic policies at the national level.

Trump's negative influence is turning into a positive for those candidates -- particularly in the big cities.

"From New York City to Los Angeles, many of the nation’s biggest cities have turned even harder to the left under President Donald Trump, putting pressure on local officials to embrace the leading progressive presidential candidates — or withhold their endorsements entirely for fear of antagonizing newly energized activists," the report states. "It’s a drastic political shift in some places, where for decades entrenched party bosses crushed any signs of life on the left or tended to put the weight of big-city institutional support behind Democratic establishment-oriented candidates."

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‘Not true’: Manic GOPer Mark Meadows shut down by CNN’s Bash for repeating lie about Ukraine

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A fifteen-minute CNN interview with Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC) wound down to an abrupt end on Sunday morning as the "State of the Union" host Dana Bash cut off the Trump defender's insistence there was no quid pro quo offer from the president to Ukraine's leadership, with the CNN host telling the GOP lawmaker, "That's not true. I don't want to debate about it."

In an interview where Meadows continued to rage about former Vice President Joe Biden's son Hunter, Bash finally brought up Trump's phone call to Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky that led to the impeachment inquiry.

Discussing the call where Trump asked for a favor, Meadows pushed back after she said Trump, "Allegedly held up aid and he said it in this phone call."

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