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Here’s one big reason why Trump is having a white-hot meltdown over the Fed not dropping interest rates

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Composite image of President Donald Trump and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell (screengrabs)

President Donald Trump has a personal conflict-of-interest that may be impacting his decisions in his public feud with Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell.

“President Trump stands to save millions of dollars annually in interest on outstanding loans on his hotels and resorts if the Federal Reserve lowers rates as he has been demanding, according to public filings and financial experts,” The Washington Post reported Saturday.

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“In the five years before he became president, Trump borrowed more than $360 million via four loans from Deutsche Bank for his hotels in Washington, D.C., and Chicago, as well his 643-room Doral golf resort in South Florida,” the newspaper reported. “The payments on all four properties vary with interest rate changes, according to Trump’s official financial disclosures. That means he has already benefited from falling interest rates that were spurred in part by a cut the Federal Reserve announced in July, the first in more than a decade — and his payments could drop by millions of dollars more annually if the central bank grants Trump’s wish and further lowers short-term rates, experts said.”

Trump refused to disinvest himself from his businesses when he took office. The Trump Organization is currently being run by Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump.

“Since taking office, Trump has aggressively sought to lower interest rates and rejected the mostly hands-off approach other presidents have taken to the Fed, repeatedly blasting Chair Jerome H. Powell — whom Trump appointed to the post last year — for not falling in line,” The Post noted.

Trump could make millions off of the move.

“Beginning in 2012, Deutsche Bank provide Trump’s company with about $364 million in loans by working through the bank’s private wealth division, rather than through traditional commercial lending units, according to public loan documents. The borrowing was for two loans totaling $125 million to buy and renovate the Doral golf resort in Florida, a $170 million loan to renovate Washington’s Old Post Office Pavilion into a Trump hotel and a $69 million loan to refinance an existing Trump hotel in Chicago,” the newspaper noted.

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“Trump could save at least $600,000 and as much as $1.1 million annually on just the larger of the two Doral loans if the Fed made a percentage point reduction, depending on the loan agreement, according to Clifford Rossi, a professor at the University of Maryland’s business school,” The Post noted. “Even a quarter-point reduction, which most Wall Street investors now predict will occur in mid-September, could save Trump as much as $275,000 annually on that single Doral loan.”


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Rick Wilson urges ‘humiliation and incarceration’ for the GOP’s ‘grubby sellouts’ who propped up Trump for 4 years

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Republicans know the end of Donald Trump's presidency is near, despite his increasingly desperate legal challenges, and former GOP strategist Rick Wilson won't be willing to forgive and forget.

Wilson, writing for The Daily Beast, imagines there will be a rush of Republicans to distance themselves from the soon-to-be-former president, but he said there will be copious evidence of lawmakers, governors and political professional debasing themselves for Trump.

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Expert explains why ‘systemic conservatism’ continues to prevail in America

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On the Sunday after the November 3rd presidential election, Utah Senator Mitt Romney, the 2012 Republican presidential candidate, congratulated President-elect Joe Biden but insisted that the overall election was an endorsement of conservative principles. He pointed to the gains Republicans made in the House, though they are still in the minority, and the failure of the Democrats to capture control of the Senate, at least so far. Romney found further evidence in the Democrats' inability to flip GOP-controlled statehouses.

Romney, however, is mistaken in his basic assertion. First of all, Biden won by more than 5 million popular votes, nearly 4 percent more than Trump's total. The president-elect obtained the highest number of popular votes in the nation's history. Biden's margin of victory, contrary to Romney's claim, is not a mandate for conservatism. Rather, at the very least, the election was a referendum on President Trump's leadership, which of course Trump used to promote conservative ideas concerning tax cuts for the wealthy and the relaxation of business and environmental regulations.

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2020 Election

Expert breaks down the ultimate goal of Trump’s ‘classic Russian-style disinformation campaign’

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Jonathan Rauch, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute, spoke with CNN's Brian Stelter on Sunday to explain the ultimate goal of President Donald Trump's false accusations of a rigged and stolen election.

Rauch was asked by Stelter if the issue is Trump is simply trapped in the delusion that he actually beat President-elect Joe Biden in the 2020 election.

"Is delusion a fair word for these election lies?" Stelter wondered.

"No, actually, I don't think it is," Rauch replied. "It's hard to know what's going on in the mind of the president, but you don't really need to. What you need to know is that what he is running right now is a classic Russian-style disinformation campaign of a type known as the firehose of falsehood. That's when you utilize every channel, not just media, but also the bully pulpit, even litigation to push out as many different stories and conspiracy theories and lies and half-truths as you possibly can in order to flood the zone if with disinformation."

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