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Kentucky Democrats sell $200,000 of ‘Moscow Mitch’ gear in 48 hours: report

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On Saturday, Fox News reported that the Kentucky Democratic Party is claiming a haul of $200,000 from their line of “Moscow Mitch” merchandise that went live on their campaign webstore just two days ago.

Kentucky Democrats are selling T-shirts, bumper stickers, mugs, and beer cozies that mock Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell with the slogan, “Just say NYET! to Moscow Mitch.” They are also selling “Moscow Mitch” vodka shot glasses that are “also compatible with Kentucky Bourbon,” and even traditional Russian Cossack hats emblazoned with the Moscow Mitch slogan.

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“This campaign has really caught the imagination of voters in Kentucky and across the country,” said Kentucky Democratic spokeswoman Marisa McNee in a statement.

The proceeds are a badly-needed windfall for the party as Kentucky heads into its 2019 gubernatorial election, where firebrand Republican Gov. Matt Bevin is fighting to win a second term despite being the lowest-polling governor in America. McConnell himself stands for re-election in 2020, and has attracted a high-profile challenger in former fighter pilot Amy McGrath.

McConnell has rapidly acquired the nickname “Moscow Mitch” due to his stubborn obstruction of a series of bipartisan election security bills to prevent the presidential election from being attacked by Russia in 2020.

McConnell has angrily denied any loyalty to Russia, claiming that he opposes the bills because he has already appropriated money for election security and the bills would give Democrats a partisan advantage — although he hasn’t bothered to come up with any specific example of how they would. He has complained that the nickname amounts to “modern-day McCarthyism.”

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US ‘lies’ slammed after Mike Pompeo blames Iran for drone attacks without proof

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Iranian Foreign Ministry Spokesman Abbas Mousavi forcefully rejected Sunday unsubstantiated charges by by US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and US Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) regarding the recent drone attacks that caused serious damage to two crucial Saudi Arabian oil installations.

“It has been around 5 years that the Saudi-led coalition has kept the flames of war alive in the region by repeatedly launching aggression against Yemen and committing different types of war crimes, and the Yemenis have also shown that they are standing up to war and aggression,” Seyyed Abbas Mousavi said in a statement.

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Why are college students so stressed out? It’s not because they’re ‘snowflakes’

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Across the country, college classes are well underway, the excitement of the start of the year is waning and student stress is on the rise. Frantic calls home and panicked visits to student health services will start to dramatically increase. And before long, parents and observers will start wondering what is wrong with these kids. Why can’t they handle the pressures of college and just pull it together?

College student stress is nothing new. Anxieties over homesickness, social pressures, challenging course loads and more have been a common feature of the U.S. college experience for decades. But, without question, student stress levels and psychological distress are measurably worse than before. According to a national study published earlier this year in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, major depression among young adults (18-25) rose 63 percent between 2009 and 2017. They also report that the rate of young adults with suicidal thoughts or other suicide-related outcomes increased 47 percent from 2008 to 2017.

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Kaiser healthcare workers plan for nation’s largest strike since 1997

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More than 80,000 Kaiser Permanente emergency medical technicians, nurses, respiratory therapists and other staffers are threatening to walk out of work next month, in what could be the nation's largest strike since 1997.

The authorization to strike, approved by 98% of the union members who voted, does not mean a walk out will happen, but it does allow union leaders to call one as early as Oct. 1, giving them leverage ahead of negotiations with the California-based health care giant. Kaiser Permanente, comprised of 39 hospitals and nearly 700 medical officers, serves more than 12 million members in seven states across the country.

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