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Maddow reveals how white supremacists can still lose in court — even if Bill Barr refuses to prosecute

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The host of “The Rachel Maddow Show” on MSNBC explained how white supremacist terrorists can still lose in court — even if Attorney General Bill Barr refuses to prosecute members of President Donald Trump’s base.

Maddow reported on the movement since the 1980s to go after organization in civil courts. She noted huge judgments against the Ku Klux Klan in Alabama, skinheads in Oregon and the Aryan Nation in Idaho.

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“In the wake of the El Paso attack this weekend and other recent incidents of white nationalist and white supremacist violence and amid worries about the Trump administration’s attitude toward extremism of this exact kind, should this sort of thing be seen as a viable tactic?” Maddow wondered. “I mean, practically can it work?”

“Is this the kind of movement that could actually be hurt by being bankrupted, by being organizationally disrupted?” she asked. “Could these kinds of legal strategies be a strong alternative, particularly if the federal government is going to be an unreliable partner for the victims of these crimes?”

For analysis, Maddow interviewed Eli Saslow, the author of the 2018 book Rising Out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist.

“We have seen in the past, people go after the organizational hubs, the leaders of various groups, trying to bankrupt them, trying to sort of organizationally decapitate them to slow down the movement. Do you feel like with the modern iteration of this movement that might be an effective strategy?” Maddow asked.

“I think it definitely can be effective and it has a place,” Saslow replied. “Unfortunately, I don’t think it’s a way to defeat white supremacy in the United States overall. That’s unfortunately a really tall order, because it’s so endemic in what this country is.”

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“But I think these judgments that have been won in some of these cases you’ve highlighted tonight, they’re empowering for people who historically and currently have been disenfranchised by the white supremacy movement or killed by the white supremacy movement or wounded or injured,” he continued.

“And, you know, that matters. To acknowledge that matters,” he explained. “And our country as a whole has not often been good at acknowledging that pain and suffering that has come on the other end of white supremacy.”

“So I think as a tactic it’s really useful and it’s emboldening for anti-racists to see that you can win and you can get big judgments against these people, Saslow concluded.

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Chief Justice Roberts admonishes lawyers at Senate impeachment trial

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Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court John Roberts made his first major intervention in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial shortly before 1 a.m. Wednesday morning.

After House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) finished his closing arguments on why former National Security Advisor John Bolton should testify, the White House team went on the attack. Yelling and demanding apologies, the president's team was more animated than they'd been all night. Roberts then admonished the House and White House on their language.

Claiming the Senate is the "world's greatest deliberative body" -- despite what he had witnessed during 12 hours of the impeachment trial -- Roberts complained about language that was "not conducive to civil discourse."

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White House lawyers begin yelling at Democrats during late-night impeachment trial — after Trump starts tweeting

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President Donald Trump woke up and began tweeting around midnight EST during the Senate impeachment trial over the amendments over the rules. That's when a noticeable thing changed on the Senate floor: Trump's team started yelling.

Nearing 1 a.m. EST Tuesday morning while the president was tweeting about impeachment, his team began attacking Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) personally. They called him a liar and accused him of attacking the president and demanded an apology. After nearly 12 hours this was the first time the White House got even remotely animated after a dull defense of the president.

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2020 Election

Mick Mulvaney released treasure trove of OMB documents — 2 minutes before midnight

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Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney released a huge cache of documents on Tuesday evening -- minutes before the midnight deadline.

The documents were released to the ethics group American oversight, which had pursued a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit against the department.

"Two minutes before midnight, OMB released 192 pages of Ukraine-related records to American Oversight, including emails that have not been previously released," American Oversight announced.

"The files released tonight include emails sent by OMB Acting Director Russell Vought and Assoc Director for National Security Michael Duffey — two key players in the withholding of Ukraine aid — in on the morning of President Trump’s July 25 call with President Zelensky," the ethics group noted.

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