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Monsanto doctor wanted to ‘beat the sh*t out of’ group of mothers: Emails

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One advocate said the emails revealed “the utter contempt that Monsanto has for public health and for consumers, including mothers who only want to protect their kids’ health.”

Leaked emails from scientists working with agrichemical giant Monsanto feature company leaders in 2013 wishing they could “beat the shit out of” advocacy group Moms Across America.

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Moms Across America wrote an open letter asking Monsanto to discontinue the use of the pesticide glyphosate—which some research has tied to cancers—and to stop producing genetically modified seeds that was seen by company executives as a public relations disaster.

“I have been arguing for a week to beat the shit out of them and I have clearly lost,” Monsanto’s Dr. Daniel Goldstein wrote to University of Georgia crop scientist Wayne Parrott and University of Illinois biochemist Bruce Chassy. “We don’t want to be seen as beating up on mothers.”

The emails were released as part of litigation relating to the cancer-causing effects of glyphosate against Monsanto’s now-parent company Bayer.

“There you have it,” tweeted rePlant Capital vice president Robyn O’Brien.

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The emails, New York Times reporter Eric Lipton said on Twitter, show “how Monsanto worked to try to influence public opinion, in alliance with academics who it sometimes helped fund.”

In a statement, green advocacy organization the Environmental Working Group’s president Ken Cook said the emails revealed “the utter contempt that Monsanto has for public health and for consumers, including mothers who only want to protect their kids’ health.”

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“Bayer is reeling from its monumental blunder of buying Monsanto,” said Cook, “and these emails should remind them that they acquired the company that gave us DDT, Agent Orange, and PCBs.”

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2020 Election

Corey Lewandowski may use Judiciary Committee hearing to launch New Hampshire Senate run

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Former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski will appear before the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday to answer questions about incidents outlined in special counsel Robert Mueller's report. But he may use the appearance as a way to launch his New Hampshire Senate run.

Axios reported Sunday that the former top aide to President Donald Trump is eager for a fiery exchange between him and Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) and other Democrats.

“Corey will use [the hearing] as part of the campaign. He will be confrontational to the Democrats. He will be totally loyal to Trump. And he will be playing to the right-wing of the party who need to unite behind him in a primary," said former New Hampshire Attorney General Thomas Rath.

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General Motors auto workers call strike in US

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The United Auto Workers union called a nationwide strike against General Motors Sunday, with some 46,000 members set to walk off the job beginning at midnight amid an impasse in contract talks.

The decision, which the Wall Street Journal described as the first major stoppage at GM in more than a decade, came a day after the manufacturer's four-year contract with workers expired without an agreement on a replacement.

Local union leaders met in Detroit "and opted to strike at midnight on Sunday," the UAW said on its Twitter account.

"This is our last resort," Terry Dittes, the union's lead negotiator with GM, told a news conference after the meeting. "We are standing up for the fundamental rights of working people in this country."

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Saudi Arabia races to restore oil supply — drone strike blamed on Iran

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Saudi Arabia raced on Sunday to restart operations at oil plants hit by drone attacks which slashed its production by half, as Iran dismissed US claims it was behind the assault.

The Tehran-backed Huthi rebels in neighbouring Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition is bogged down in a five-year war, claimed Saturday's strikes on two plants owned by state energy giant Aramco.

But US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pointed the finger squarely at Tehran, saying there was no evidence the "unprecedented attack on the world's energy supply" was launched from Yemen.

"The United States will work with our partners and allies to ensure that energy markets remain well supplied and Iran is held accountable for its aggression," the top US diplomat added.

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